International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

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Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel

Received: 23 January 2024    Accepted: 8 February 2024    Published: 20 February 2024
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Abstract

Tanzania is a tropical country that lies few degrees south of the equator The coast area includes regions such as Dar es Salaam and Coastal region which are hot and humid with cooling breezes of the Indian Ocean. Awareness of society is a crucial aspect of ensuring the safety and quality of food. One of the risk factors in food safety is the presence of aflatoxin in various foods such as cereals, and groundnuts. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of awareness of aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize and maize flour used for meals in boarding secondary schools. A total of 90 respondents from 30 schools from 7 districts of the two regions were interviewed. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information and the survey showed that 74.4% of the respondents were aware of aflatoxin contamination. 85.6% of respondents know that aflatoxin is found in food and only 14.4% were not aware. 74.4% were capable of selecting the correct list of food that can be contaminated with aflatoxin while 11.1% selected the wrong list. 14.4% of the respondents were unable to select the list of foods that can be contaminated with aflatoxin. These results indicate that most of them are aware of the issue of aflatoxin contamination in maize and its products which is good for reducing aflatoxin contamination in food products and its effect. An effective and broad awareness program for the society including boarding school personnel and students on good management of food for prevention of aflatoxins contamination and its health effects is necessary, as maize and its products are the most consumed grain in the study area.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14
Published in International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology (Volume 9, Issue 1, March 2024)
Page(s) 21-29
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Awareness of Society, Aflatoxin, Boarding Secondary Schools

References
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  • APA Style

    Abdu, M. M., Rashid, S., Beatrice, K. (2024). Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel. International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 9(1), 21-29. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14

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    ACS Style

    Abdu, M. M.; Rashid, S.; Beatrice, K. Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel. Int. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 2024, 9(1), 21-29. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14

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    AMA Style

    Abdu MM, Rashid S, Beatrice K. Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel. Int J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2024;9(1):21-29. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14,
      author = {Mfinanga Mariam Abdu and Suleiman Rashid and Kilima Beatrice},
      title = {Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel},
      journal = {International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology},
      volume = {9},
      number = {1},
      pages = {21-29},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijmb.20240901.14},
      abstract = {Tanzania is a tropical country that lies few degrees south of the equator The coast area includes regions such as Dar es Salaam and Coastal region which are hot and humid with cooling breezes of the Indian Ocean. Awareness of society is a crucial aspect of ensuring the safety and quality of food. One of the risk factors in food safety is the presence of aflatoxin in various foods such as cereals, and groundnuts. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of awareness of aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize and maize flour used for meals in boarding secondary schools. A total of 90 respondents from 30 schools from 7 districts of the two regions were interviewed. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information and the survey showed that 74.4% of the respondents were aware of aflatoxin contamination. 85.6% of respondents know that aflatoxin is found in food and only 14.4% were not aware. 74.4% were capable of selecting the correct list of food that can be contaminated with aflatoxin while 11.1% selected the wrong list. 14.4% of the respondents were unable to select the list of foods that can be contaminated with aflatoxin. These results indicate that most of them are aware of the issue of aflatoxin contamination in maize and its products which is good for reducing aflatoxin contamination in food products and its effect. An effective and broad awareness program for the society including boarding school personnel and students on good management of food for prevention of aflatoxins contamination and its health effects is necessary, as maize and its products are the most consumed grain in the study area.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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    T1  - Assessment the Level of Awareness of Aflatoxin Contaminations in Maize-Based Meals Among Boarding School Personnel
    AU  - Mfinanga Mariam Abdu
    AU  - Suleiman Rashid
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    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijmb.20240901.14
    AB  - Tanzania is a tropical country that lies few degrees south of the equator The coast area includes regions such as Dar es Salaam and Coastal region which are hot and humid with cooling breezes of the Indian Ocean. Awareness of society is a crucial aspect of ensuring the safety and quality of food. One of the risk factors in food safety is the presence of aflatoxin in various foods such as cereals, and groundnuts. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of awareness of aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize and maize flour used for meals in boarding secondary schools. A total of 90 respondents from 30 schools from 7 districts of the two regions were interviewed. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information and the survey showed that 74.4% of the respondents were aware of aflatoxin contamination. 85.6% of respondents know that aflatoxin is found in food and only 14.4% were not aware. 74.4% were capable of selecting the correct list of food that can be contaminated with aflatoxin while 11.1% selected the wrong list. 14.4% of the respondents were unable to select the list of foods that can be contaminated with aflatoxin. These results indicate that most of them are aware of the issue of aflatoxin contamination in maize and its products which is good for reducing aflatoxin contamination in food products and its effect. An effective and broad awareness program for the society including boarding school personnel and students on good management of food for prevention of aflatoxins contamination and its health effects is necessary, as maize and its products are the most consumed grain in the study area.
    
    VL  - 9
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Author Information
  • Department of Food Science and Agro-Processing, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania

  • Tanzania Bureau of Standards, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

  • Tanzania Bureau of Standards, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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