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Association Between Food Safety Knowledge and Practice of Food Handlers in Food Businesses at Kushtia, Bangladesh

The target of this study was to evaluation of knowledge, and practices regarding food safety problems among street food workers at Kushtia, leading face to face discussion and directing questionnaire. Of the 200 food workers who responded, 3.05% were involved in stirring or allotting unpacked foods regularly and use self-protective gloves during their working practices. Almost all contributors had not taken basic food safety training. The mean food safety knowledge scores were 23.4±10.3. The study presented that food handlers in Kushtia Sadar food businesses frequently have absence of knowledge concerning the basic food safety. There is an immediately necessary for education and increasing alertness among food handlers concerning safe food handling practices.

Food Handlers, Food Businesses, Knowledge, Practices

APA Style

Tamanna Aktar, Md. Alauddin Biswas. (2022). Association Between Food Safety Knowledge and Practice of Food Handlers in Food Businesses at Kushtia, Bangladesh. Research & Development, 3(1), 23-27. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220301.15

ACS Style

Tamanna Aktar; Md. Alauddin Biswas. Association Between Food Safety Knowledge and Practice of Food Handlers in Food Businesses at Kushtia, Bangladesh. Res. Dev. 2022, 3(1), 23-27. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220301.15

AMA Style

Tamanna Aktar, Md. Alauddin Biswas. Association Between Food Safety Knowledge and Practice of Food Handlers in Food Businesses at Kushtia, Bangladesh. Res Dev. 2022;3(1):23-27. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220301.15

Copyright © 2022 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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