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Research Article |

Morphological Diversity and Ethnobotanical Study of Enset (Ensete ventricosum) (Welw.) Cheesman in Kebena, Cheha and Ezha Woredas, Gurage Zone, SPNNRS, Ethiopia

ENSET is a multipurpose crop in which every part is thoroughly utilized, not only for food but also for several cultural applications and livestock feed. It is primarily used as food, feed, medicinal, ornamental, and raw material for industries and construction materials. As a species, ENSET morphology is highly variable, although the extent of its variation remains unknown. The purpose of this study is therefore (i) to identify the existing ENSET diversity, (ii) to identify morphological trait variability among landraces of Enset, and (iii) to identify threats that affect ENSET diversity and to understand the associated indigenous knowledge in the study area with the ultimate goal of providing information that will help in constructing a scientific basis for the conservation and sustainable use of the plant. The study was carried out in ten purposively selected kebeles of three districts in the Gurage zone. A total of 100 (20 purposively selected key informants and 80 randomly selected general informants) were interviewed using semi-structured interviews; field observations and guided field walks were also used to collect ethnobotanical data. Morphological traits were measured according to Enset IBPGR (International Board for Plant Genetic Resources) descriptors. The data were analyzed by using computer software R v 3.2.2 and SPSS v 16.0 as well as an Excel 2010 spreadsheet. Direct matrix ranking and preference ranking were also used to analyze the ethnobotanical information. A total of 33 ENSET landraces were identified from the study area. Farmers give the name for their landraces based on morphological traits and sources of planting material. The identified landraces grouped into five clusters based on morphological trait variability. Mean plant height, pseudo stem height and cecum, leaf size and number were significantly different (p<0.05) among clusters. The most abundant landraces were Lemat Nechiwe Yeshirafire and Kanchiwe in Kabena District, whereas Agade and Yeshirakinke were the most abundant in Cheha. Yeshirakinke, Nechiwe, Agade and Kibinar were the most dominant landraces in the third study district. ENSET is an important food crop consumed in the form of bulla, Kocho and Amicho. In addition, ENSET is used as animal feed, as well as a source of medicine and fiber. This study confirms that the Gurage zone is rich in diversity of ENSET, but a reduction in production and loss of some landrace was observed because of different factors.

Ensete ventricosum, Kebena, Cheha, Ezha Morphological Trait

APA Style

Jarso, A., Demissew, S., Wondimu, T. (2023). Morphological Diversity and Ethnobotanical Study of Enset (Ensete ventricosum) (Welw.) Cheesman in Kebena, Cheha and Ezha Woredas, Gurage Zone, SPNNRS, Ethiopia. Plant, 11(4), 135-142. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.plant.20231104.14

ACS Style

Jarso, A.; Demissew, S.; Wondimu, T. Morphological Diversity and Ethnobotanical Study of Enset (Ensete ventricosum) (Welw.) Cheesman in Kebena, Cheha and Ezha Woredas, Gurage Zone, SPNNRS, Ethiopia. Plant. 2023, 11(4), 135-142. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20231104.14

AMA Style

Jarso A, Demissew S, Wondimu T. Morphological Diversity and Ethnobotanical Study of Enset (Ensete ventricosum) (Welw.) Cheesman in Kebena, Cheha and Ezha Woredas, Gurage Zone, SPNNRS, Ethiopia. Plant. 2023;11(4):135-142. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20231104.14

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This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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