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Postural Predisposition to Cervical Spondylosis Among Housewives, Teachers, Computers and Smart Phones Users

Background: The relationship between postural changes around the neck and the development of cervical spondylosis maybe something that's not fully understood and accepted but there some evidence that proves their relationship. Aim: This is review article on the effect of persistent postural changes around the neck on the development of cervical spondylosis and while cervical spondylosis is prevalent among housewives whose most of their house chores required bending of the neck, teachers who writes much of notes, prolonged computer users and in adolescents with prolonged usage of smartphones. Methods: A careful literature search was made on some scientific search engines like pubMed, EMBase using a very sensitive search strategy on researches made on cervical spondylosis and careful analysis was done to link the development to some postural activities another the cervical axis of the spine. Results: The reviews show evidence of relationship between posture and development of cervical spondylosis.

Cervical Spine, Cervical Spondylosis, Postural Predisposition, Occupational Predisposition

APA Style

Kehinde Alare, Taiwo Omoniyo, Tosin Adekanle. (2021). Postural Predisposition to Cervical Spondylosis Among Housewives, Teachers, Computers and Smart Phones Users. International Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 7(2), 14-19. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnpt.20210702.11

ACS Style

Kehinde Alare; Taiwo Omoniyo; Tosin Adekanle. Postural Predisposition to Cervical Spondylosis Among Housewives, Teachers, Computers and Smart Phones Users. Int. J. Neurol. Phys. Ther. 2021, 7(2), 14-19. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnpt.20210702.11

AMA Style

Kehinde Alare, Taiwo Omoniyo, Tosin Adekanle. Postural Predisposition to Cervical Spondylosis Among Housewives, Teachers, Computers and Smart Phones Users. Int J Neurol Phys Ther. 2021;7(2):14-19. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnpt.20210702.11

Copyright © 2021 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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