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Effects of Nitrate and Sulfate Attacks on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Concrete by Replacing Virgin Aggregates with Recycled Aggregate Concrete Cluster

Concrete recycling yields a considerable amount of steel and aggregates. Lack of information on recycling and reuse of recycled aggregate concrete cluster combined with construction and demolition waste in Ethiopia. The main aim of the research is to investigate the effects of ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate on the mechanical and physical properties of concrete made from stone crushed aggregate by the possible extent of the inclusion of recycled aggregate concrete clusters. The mechanical and physical properties investigated are compressive strength, water absorption, and unit weight. Investigations are carried out on C-30 grade concrete mix design having a water-to-cement ratio of 0.435 and slump of 25~100mm at replacement levels of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% crushed stone aggregate by recycled aggregate concrete cluster. Test specimens were prepared by placing the concrete-based material into 0.15*0.15*0.15m molds. The concrete specimens were immersed in ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate solutions with 5% (50g/L) concentrations. After 28 days of curing of specimens in distilled water, some of the specimens were immersed in ammonium nitrate and some of them were immersed in magnesium sulfate solutions until 56 days before testing. Test results showed that the compressive strength decreased when the concrete specimens were treated with ammonium nitrate solutions and as the replacement levels of RACC increased and reduction in compressive strength increased clearly. It is also found that the water absorption of concrete specimens increases while the unit weight of specimens decreases when the specimens are exposed to ammonium nitrate solutions. For specimens immersed in magnesium sulfate solutions, a decrease in compressive strength is found through the conducted experiments as well as the loss in strength increases as the replacement levels increase. The results also showed that water absorption and unit weight of specimens were largely clear, still, for magnesium sulfate, there was an increase in water absorption and a decrease in unit weight as replacement levels increase. It concluded that it was established that recycled aggregate concrete clusters can replace crushed stone aggregate by twenty percent. Thus, Further study is suggested to find the most economical way to compensate for the lost fifteen to twenty percent compressive strengths.

Crushed Stone Aggregate, Recycled Aggregate Concrete, Performance of Concrete, Regression

APA Style

Assefa Tekla Bedada. (2022). Effects of Nitrate and Sulfate Attacks on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Concrete by Replacing Virgin Aggregates with Recycled Aggregate Concrete Cluster. Engineering Science, 7(3), 46-53. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.es.20220703.12

ACS Style

Assefa Tekla Bedada. Effects of Nitrate and Sulfate Attacks on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Concrete by Replacing Virgin Aggregates with Recycled Aggregate Concrete Cluster. Eng. Sci. 2022, 7(3), 46-53. doi: 10.11648/j.es.20220703.12

AMA Style

Assefa Tekla Bedada. Effects of Nitrate and Sulfate Attacks on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Concrete by Replacing Virgin Aggregates with Recycled Aggregate Concrete Cluster. Eng Sci. 2022;7(3):46-53. doi: 10.11648/j.es.20220703.12

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This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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