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Application of Response Surface Design to Optimize the Production of Bioethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass (Maize cob)

Another sustainable energy source with many uses is bioethanol. The investigation of diluted H2SO4 hydrolysis (0.25 M to 2 M) was initially conducted in this context of producing bioethanol from maize cob using a magnetic stirrer at varied temperatures (40 to 100°C) and reaction times (60 to 105 min) with the purpose of optimizing the processes. According to the findings, a low glucose output was seen at low acid concentrations of 0.25 M and 0.5 M, increasing gradually at 1 M and 2 M. At a high temperature of 90°C, a significant glucose yield was seen, with the glucose yield decreasing as the reaction time increased past 90 minutes. The outcome additionally demonstrated that yeast affected the glucose yield during fermentation. After fermentation, bioethanol was later recovered by distillation at 78.9°C. Bioethanol characterization showed that kinematic octane rating was 117, cloud point was -11, pour point was -13, flash point was 16.5, and specific gravity was 0.781. The empirical model obtained showed that reaction time, catalyst concentration and reaction temperature are the most important variables that influence the process.

Bioethanol, Maize cob, Fermentation, Optimizing

APA Style

Ogala Harrison, Ige Ayodeji Raphael, Adipere Ebiye, Iboyi Nathaniel, Chidozie Ekene. (2022). Application of Response Surface Design to Optimize the Production of Bioethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass (Maize cob). Journal of Biomaterials, 6(2), 20-24. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jb.20220602.11

ACS Style

Ogala Harrison; Ige Ayodeji Raphael; Adipere Ebiye; Iboyi Nathaniel; Chidozie Ekene. Application of Response Surface Design to Optimize the Production of Bioethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass (Maize cob). J. Biomater. 2022, 6(2), 20-24. doi: 10.11648/j.jb.20220602.11

AMA Style

Ogala Harrison, Ige Ayodeji Raphael, Adipere Ebiye, Iboyi Nathaniel, Chidozie Ekene. Application of Response Surface Design to Optimize the Production of Bioethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass (Maize cob). J Biomater. 2022;6(2):20-24. doi: 10.11648/j.jb.20220602.11

Copyright © 2022 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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