World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology

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Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia

Received: Sep. 11, 2023    Accepted: Oct. 13, 2023    Published: Oct. 28, 2023
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Abstract

The main factors limiting yield for faba bean production in the research area include low soil fertility, which is constituted of low accessible P, total N, and S. Five doses of NPS (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg/ha) were used in a field experiment in Bore at the station of the Bore Agricultural Research Centre. The experiment used a randomized full block design with three replications. The study's objectives were to determine economically viable blended NPS rates that boost faba bean productivity as well as to evaluate the impact of blended NPS rates on the yield and yield characteristics of several faba bean varieties. On all investigated parameters, with the exception of days to flowering and harvest index, the results demonstrated a substantial impact of different quantities of blended fertilizer. The maximum value was achieved with 200 kg/ha NPS, with plant height (167.5 cm), days to physiological maturity (197.0), and total biomass (10666 kg ha-1). The greatest value, 150 kg/ha, was achieved by the number of pods per plant (19.62), seeds per pod (3.13), grain production (4278 kg ha-1), and agronomic efficiency (1466%). The best net benefit (105955.8 Birr ha-1) and highest marginal rate of return (993.22%) were both achieved with the application of 150 kg NPS. Therefore, based on soil result and economic analysis production faba bean with the application of 150 kg NPS ha-1 was most productive for economical production and can be recommended for highlands of Guji Zone.

DOI 10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14
Published in World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology ( Volume 1, Issue 4, December 2023 )
Page(s) 98-105
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Blended Fertilizer, Faba Bean, Gebelcho, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Sulphur

References
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    Deresa Shumi, Tekalign Afeta, Rehoboth Nuguse. (2023). Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia. World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology, 1(4), 98-105. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14

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    ACS Style

    Deresa Shumi; Tekalign Afeta; Rehoboth Nuguse. Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia. World J. Agric. Sci. Technol. 2023, 1(4), 98-105. doi: 10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14

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    AMA Style

    Deresa Shumi, Tekalign Afeta, Rehoboth Nuguse. Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia. World J Agric Sci Technol. 2023;1(4):98-105. doi: 10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14,
      author = {Deresa Shumi and Tekalign Afeta and Rehoboth Nuguse},
      title = {Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia},
      journal = {World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology},
      volume = {1},
      number = {4},
      pages = {98-105},
      doi = {10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.wjast.20230104.14},
      abstract = {The main factors limiting yield for faba bean production in the research area include low soil fertility, which is constituted of low accessible P, total N, and S. Five doses of NPS (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg/ha) were used in a field experiment in Bore at the station of the Bore Agricultural Research Centre. The experiment used a randomized full block design with three replications. The study's objectives were to determine economically viable blended NPS rates that boost faba bean productivity as well as to evaluate the impact of blended NPS rates on the yield and yield characteristics of several faba bean varieties. On all investigated parameters, with the exception of days to flowering and harvest index, the results demonstrated a substantial impact of different quantities of blended fertilizer. The maximum value was achieved with 200 kg/ha NPS, with plant height (167.5 cm), days to physiological maturity (197.0), and total biomass (10666 kg ha-1). The greatest value, 150 kg/ha, was achieved by the number of pods per plant (19.62), seeds per pod (3.13), grain production (4278 kg ha-1), and agronomic efficiency (1466%). The best net benefit (105955.8 Birr ha-1) and highest marginal rate of return (993.22%) were both achieved with the application of 150 kg NPS. Therefore, based on soil result and economic analysis production faba bean with the application of 150 kg NPS ha-1 was most productive for economical production and can be recommended for highlands of Guji Zone.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Response of Blended NPS Fertilizer Rates on Growth, Yield Attributes and Yield of Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) in Acidic Red Soil Under Limed Condition in Bore, Southern Ethiopia
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    AU  - Rehoboth Nuguse
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    DO  - 10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14
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    JF  - World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology
    JO  - World Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology
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    EP  - 105
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2994-7332
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.wjast.20230104.14
    AB  - The main factors limiting yield for faba bean production in the research area include low soil fertility, which is constituted of low accessible P, total N, and S. Five doses of NPS (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg/ha) were used in a field experiment in Bore at the station of the Bore Agricultural Research Centre. The experiment used a randomized full block design with three replications. The study's objectives were to determine economically viable blended NPS rates that boost faba bean productivity as well as to evaluate the impact of blended NPS rates on the yield and yield characteristics of several faba bean varieties. On all investigated parameters, with the exception of days to flowering and harvest index, the results demonstrated a substantial impact of different quantities of blended fertilizer. The maximum value was achieved with 200 kg/ha NPS, with plant height (167.5 cm), days to physiological maturity (197.0), and total biomass (10666 kg ha-1). The greatest value, 150 kg/ha, was achieved by the number of pods per plant (19.62), seeds per pod (3.13), grain production (4278 kg ha-1), and agronomic efficiency (1466%). The best net benefit (105955.8 Birr ha-1) and highest marginal rate of return (993.22%) were both achieved with the application of 150 kg NPS. Therefore, based on soil result and economic analysis production faba bean with the application of 150 kg NPS ha-1 was most productive for economical production and can be recommended for highlands of Guji Zone.
    
    VL  - 1
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Author Information
  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Bore Agricultural Research Centre, Bore, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Bore Agricultural Research Centre, Bore, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Bore Agricultural Research Centre, Bore, Ethiopia

  • Section