Research & Development

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Online Learning Challenges in the Time of COVID-19: A Survey Among the Undergraduate Students of the Mindanao State University-Main Campus, Marawi City

Received: Apr. 18, 2022    Accepted: Aug. 24, 2022    Published: Oct. 11, 2022
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Abstract

The education system has recently been rocked by an extraordinary health crisis, the COVID-19 epidemic, which has shattered its foundation. As a result, governments all around the world have initiated a crisis response to offset the pandemic's negative impact on education. Curriculum adjustments, supply of technical resources and infrastructure, shifts in the academic calendar, and rules on instructional delivery and assessment are all examples of this approach. These advancements pushed educational institutions to go to complete online learning until face- to-face instruction was permitted. However, only a small percentage of public schools in the Philippines have internet connectivity. According to Aida Yuvienco, Director of the DepEd's ICT Service, "Only 26% of public schools are linked to the internet or are capable of connecting to the internet," adding that approximately 5,000 public schools in isolated locations lack access to energy. The acceptance of online learning across many learning contexts, whether formal or informal, academic or non-academic, domestic or remote, is one such development. We started to see schools, instructors, and students adopting e-learning tools that allow teachers to conduct interactive instruction, effortlessly exchange resources, and enhance student collaboration and involvement. Finally, this research proposed several potential solutions for improving the online learning environment. Addressing these issues would shed light on the wide range of challenges that undergraduate students at Mindanao State University's Main Campus in the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao face in a fully online learning environment, especially in light of the epidemic. Meanwhile, school administrators and teachers will gain from a deeper understanding of the strategies students use to overcome obstacles, allowing them to better satisfy students' online learning needs. Furthermore, the findings could be used to figure out how different types of approaches work in an online learning environment.

DOI 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11
Published in Research & Development ( Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2022 )
Page(s) 192-204
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Online Learning, COVID-19 Epidemic, Education

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  • APA Style

    Marecon Comita Viray, Ashley Ali Bangcola. (2022). Online Learning Challenges in the Time of COVID-19: A Survey Among the Undergraduate Students of the Mindanao State University-Main Campus, Marawi City. Research & Development, 3(4), 192-204. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11

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    ACS Style

    Marecon Comita Viray; Ashley Ali Bangcola. Online Learning Challenges in the Time of COVID-19: A Survey Among the Undergraduate Students of the Mindanao State University-Main Campus, Marawi City. Res. Dev. 2022, 3(4), 192-204. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11

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    AMA Style

    Marecon Comita Viray, Ashley Ali Bangcola. Online Learning Challenges in the Time of COVID-19: A Survey Among the Undergraduate Students of the Mindanao State University-Main Campus, Marawi City. Res Dev. 2022;3(4):192-204. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11,
      author = {Marecon Comita Viray and Ashley Ali Bangcola},
      title = {Online Learning Challenges in the Time of COVID-19: A Survey Among the Undergraduate Students of the Mindanao State University-Main Campus, Marawi City},
      journal = {Research & Development},
      volume = {3},
      number = {4},
      pages = {192-204},
      doi = {10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220304.11},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.rd.20220304.11},
      abstract = {The education system has recently been rocked by an extraordinary health crisis, the COVID-19 epidemic, which has shattered its foundation. As a result, governments all around the world have initiated a crisis response to offset the pandemic's negative impact on education. Curriculum adjustments, supply of technical resources and infrastructure, shifts in the academic calendar, and rules on instructional delivery and assessment are all examples of this approach. These advancements pushed educational institutions to go to complete online learning until face- to-face instruction was permitted. However, only a small percentage of public schools in the Philippines have internet connectivity. According to Aida Yuvienco, Director of the DepEd's ICT Service, "Only 26% of public schools are linked to the internet or are capable of connecting to the internet," adding that approximately 5,000 public schools in isolated locations lack access to energy. The acceptance of online learning across many learning contexts, whether formal or informal, academic or non-academic, domestic or remote, is one such development. We started to see schools, instructors, and students adopting e-learning tools that allow teachers to conduct interactive instruction, effortlessly exchange resources, and enhance student collaboration and involvement. Finally, this research proposed several potential solutions for improving the online learning environment. Addressing these issues would shed light on the wide range of challenges that undergraduate students at Mindanao State University's Main Campus in the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao face in a fully online learning environment, especially in light of the epidemic. Meanwhile, school administrators and teachers will gain from a deeper understanding of the strategies students use to overcome obstacles, allowing them to better satisfy students' online learning needs. Furthermore, the findings could be used to figure out how different types of approaches work in an online learning environment.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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    AB  - The education system has recently been rocked by an extraordinary health crisis, the COVID-19 epidemic, which has shattered its foundation. As a result, governments all around the world have initiated a crisis response to offset the pandemic's negative impact on education. Curriculum adjustments, supply of technical resources and infrastructure, shifts in the academic calendar, and rules on instructional delivery and assessment are all examples of this approach. These advancements pushed educational institutions to go to complete online learning until face- to-face instruction was permitted. However, only a small percentage of public schools in the Philippines have internet connectivity. According to Aida Yuvienco, Director of the DepEd's ICT Service, "Only 26% of public schools are linked to the internet or are capable of connecting to the internet," adding that approximately 5,000 public schools in isolated locations lack access to energy. The acceptance of online learning across many learning contexts, whether formal or informal, academic or non-academic, domestic or remote, is one such development. We started to see schools, instructors, and students adopting e-learning tools that allow teachers to conduct interactive instruction, effortlessly exchange resources, and enhance student collaboration and involvement. Finally, this research proposed several potential solutions for improving the online learning environment. Addressing these issues would shed light on the wide range of challenges that undergraduate students at Mindanao State University's Main Campus in the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao face in a fully online learning environment, especially in light of the epidemic. Meanwhile, school administrators and teachers will gain from a deeper understanding of the strategies students use to overcome obstacles, allowing them to better satisfy students' online learning needs. Furthermore, the findings could be used to figure out how different types of approaches work in an online learning environment.
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Author Information
  • Department of Public Administration, Mindanao State University, Marawi City, Philippines

  • College of Health and Sciences, Mindanao State University, Marawi City, Philippines

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