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Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study

Received: 29 March 2022    Accepted: 6 May 2022    Published: 24 May 2022
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Abstract

Introduction: In a year, 158 million cases of under-five Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) occur worldwide. Ethiopia is one of the top 15 countries in which 72% of global childhood CAP death occurs. In recognizing consequences of childhood CAP, it is important to understand the variation in the determinants. But, few studies conducted on the determinants of childhood CAP in Ethiopia and there is no previous scientific study done in Adaba district. Hence we aimed to identify determinants of CAP among children aged 2-59 months in Adaba district, West Arsi Zone, Ethiopia. Methods: We conducted a 1:1 unmatched case-control study using structured-questionnaires from April 23 to May 26, 2018 in Adaba district Ethiopia. The cases were 2-59 month’s old children who visited under-five clinics and diagnosed for CAP. The controls were children 2-59 months age who were apparently healthy and live in the community from which the cases came. We identified cases from health facility and controls by conducting house-to-house surveys. Result: A total of 528 children aged 2-59 months) took part with a response rate of 95%. Age of the child, 2-11 months (AOR=5.78, 95% CI 2.94, 11.41) and 12-23 months (AOR=4.17, 95% CI 2.22, 7.83), overcrowding (AOR=2.21, 95%-CI 1.10, 4.45) children usually located on mothers back or kept besides the mother when the mothers cook food (AOR=4.33, 95% CI 2.16, 8.68), sever stunting (AOR=3.76, 95% CI=1.58,8.93) wasting (AOR=4.77, 95% CI=1.91, 11.91) and diarrhea (AOR=5.99, 95% CI=2.91, 12.33) were risk factors. Conclusion: Age of the child, household-crowding, keeping the child with the mother while the mother cooks food, undernutrition (stunting and wasting) and diarrhea were risk of CAP. The district health office with its partners has to work to improve nutritional status of the children and existing CAP and diarrheal preventive and control methods must be strengthened and due attention should be given to children aged less than two years of old.

DOI 10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19
Published in Research & Development (Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2022)
Page(s) 125-134
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Community-Acquired-Pneumonia, Adaba, Central, Ethiopia

References
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  • APA Style

    Kedir Mude, Ayalew Astatkie. (2022). Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study. Research & Development, 3(2), 125-134. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19

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    ACS Style

    Kedir Mude; Ayalew Astatkie. Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study. Res. Dev. 2022, 3(2), 125-134. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19

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    AMA Style

    Kedir Mude, Ayalew Astatkie. Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study. Res Dev. 2022;3(2):125-134. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19

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  • @article{10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19,
      author = {Kedir Mude and Ayalew Astatkie},
      title = {Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study},
      journal = {Research & Development},
      volume = {3},
      number = {2},
      pages = {125-134},
      doi = {10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.rd.20220302.19},
      abstract = {Introduction: In a year, 158 million cases of under-five Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) occur worldwide. Ethiopia is one of the top 15 countries in which 72% of global childhood CAP death occurs. In recognizing consequences of childhood CAP, it is important to understand the variation in the determinants. But, few studies conducted on the determinants of childhood CAP in Ethiopia and there is no previous scientific study done in Adaba district. Hence we aimed to identify determinants of CAP among children aged 2-59 months in Adaba district, West Arsi Zone, Ethiopia. Methods: We conducted a 1:1 unmatched case-control study using structured-questionnaires from April 23 to May 26, 2018 in Adaba district Ethiopia. The cases were 2-59 month’s old children who visited under-five clinics and diagnosed for CAP. The controls were children 2-59 months age who were apparently healthy and live in the community from which the cases came. We identified cases from health facility and controls by conducting house-to-house surveys. Result: A total of 528 children aged 2-59 months) took part with a response rate of 95%. Age of the child, 2-11 months (AOR=5.78, 95% CI 2.94, 11.41) and 12-23 months (AOR=4.17, 95% CI 2.22, 7.83), overcrowding (AOR=2.21, 95%-CI 1.10, 4.45) children usually located on mothers back or kept besides the mother when the mothers cook food (AOR=4.33, 95% CI 2.16, 8.68), sever stunting (AOR=3.76, 95% CI=1.58,8.93) wasting (AOR=4.77, 95% CI=1.91, 11.91) and diarrhea (AOR=5.99, 95% CI=2.91, 12.33) were risk factors. Conclusion: Age of the child, household-crowding, keeping the child with the mother while the mother cooks food, undernutrition (stunting and wasting) and diarrhea were risk of CAP. The district health office with its partners has to work to improve nutritional status of the children and existing CAP and diarrheal preventive and control methods must be strengthened and due attention should be given to children aged less than two years of old.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Determinants of Community Acquired Pneumonia Among Children 2-59 Months in Adaba District, Central Ethiopia: A Case Control Study
    AU  - Kedir Mude
    AU  - Ayalew Astatkie
    Y1  - 2022/05/24
    PY  - 2022
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19
    DO  - 10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19
    T2  - Research & Development
    JF  - Research & Development
    JO  - Research & Development
    SP  - 125
    EP  - 134
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2994-7057
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220302.19
    AB  - Introduction: In a year, 158 million cases of under-five Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) occur worldwide. Ethiopia is one of the top 15 countries in which 72% of global childhood CAP death occurs. In recognizing consequences of childhood CAP, it is important to understand the variation in the determinants. But, few studies conducted on the determinants of childhood CAP in Ethiopia and there is no previous scientific study done in Adaba district. Hence we aimed to identify determinants of CAP among children aged 2-59 months in Adaba district, West Arsi Zone, Ethiopia. Methods: We conducted a 1:1 unmatched case-control study using structured-questionnaires from April 23 to May 26, 2018 in Adaba district Ethiopia. The cases were 2-59 month’s old children who visited under-five clinics and diagnosed for CAP. The controls were children 2-59 months age who were apparently healthy and live in the community from which the cases came. We identified cases from health facility and controls by conducting house-to-house surveys. Result: A total of 528 children aged 2-59 months) took part with a response rate of 95%. Age of the child, 2-11 months (AOR=5.78, 95% CI 2.94, 11.41) and 12-23 months (AOR=4.17, 95% CI 2.22, 7.83), overcrowding (AOR=2.21, 95%-CI 1.10, 4.45) children usually located on mothers back or kept besides the mother when the mothers cook food (AOR=4.33, 95% CI 2.16, 8.68), sever stunting (AOR=3.76, 95% CI=1.58,8.93) wasting (AOR=4.77, 95% CI=1.91, 11.91) and diarrhea (AOR=5.99, 95% CI=2.91, 12.33) were risk factors. Conclusion: Age of the child, household-crowding, keeping the child with the mother while the mother cooks food, undernutrition (stunting and wasting) and diarrhea were risk of CAP. The district health office with its partners has to work to improve nutritional status of the children and existing CAP and diarrheal preventive and control methods must be strengthened and due attention should be given to children aged less than two years of old.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia

  • School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia

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