Modern Chemistry

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Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves

Received: Feb. 01, 2023    Accepted: Mar. 14, 2023    Published: Mar. 31, 2023
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Abstract

Bruceaantidysenterica (abalo in Amharic) is a medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine for treatment of several diseases and ailments. This study aimed to investigate the classes of the phytochemical constituents of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica extracted with the solvents of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The crud extract evaluated their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Qualitative phytochemical screening of the leaves of this plant indicated the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols, quinones, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, tannins and cumaroins. Quantitative analysis of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica revealed that the total phenolic content, expressed as gallic acid equivalent, ranged from 28.5 to 120.06 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. Likewise, the total flavonoid content of the extract, expressed as quercetin equivalent, varied from 26.05 to 83.663 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. All extracts showed antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. As seen from ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica showed the highest total reducing power while petroleum ether extract exhibited the lowest total reducing power. Furthermore, all the extracts were tested against two gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogene) and two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, k. pneumonia) bacteria by Kirby-Bauer standard disc diffusion method. Antibacterial effects of leaves extracts of bruceaantidysenterica showed different degrees of inhibition against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts showed higher antibacterial activity than petroleum ether extracts.

DOI 10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13
Published in Modern Chemistry ( Volume 11, Issue 1, March 2023 )
Page(s) 34-42
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Bruceaantidysenterica, Antioxidant Activity, Phytochemical Constituent, Antibacterial Activity

References
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    Liyew Yizengaw Yitayih, Thevabakthi Siluvai Muthu Arul Jeevan, Solomon Libsu Bikilla, Tesfahun Dagnaw Demelash. (2023). Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves. Modern Chemistry, 11(1), 34-42. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13

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    ACS Style

    Liyew Yizengaw Yitayih; Thevabakthi Siluvai Muthu Arul Jeevan; Solomon Libsu Bikilla; Tesfahun Dagnaw Demelash. Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves. Mod. Chem. 2023, 11(1), 34-42. doi: 10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13

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    AMA Style

    Liyew Yizengaw Yitayih, Thevabakthi Siluvai Muthu Arul Jeevan, Solomon Libsu Bikilla, Tesfahun Dagnaw Demelash. Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves. Mod Chem. 2023;11(1):34-42. doi: 10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13,
      author = {Liyew Yizengaw Yitayih and Thevabakthi Siluvai Muthu Arul Jeevan and Solomon Libsu Bikilla and Tesfahun Dagnaw Demelash},
      title = {Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves},
      journal = {Modern Chemistry},
      volume = {11},
      number = {1},
      pages = {34-42},
      doi = {10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.mc.20231101.13},
      abstract = {Bruceaantidysenterica (abalo in Amharic) is a medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine for treatment of several diseases and ailments. This study aimed to investigate the classes of the phytochemical constituents of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica extracted with the solvents of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The crud extract evaluated their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Qualitative phytochemical screening of the leaves of this plant indicated the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols, quinones, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, tannins and cumaroins. Quantitative analysis of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica revealed that the total phenolic content, expressed as gallic acid equivalent, ranged from 28.5 to 120.06 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. Likewise, the total flavonoid content of the extract, expressed as quercetin equivalent, varied from 26.05 to 83.663 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. All extracts showed antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. As seen from ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica showed the highest total reducing power while petroleum ether extract exhibited the lowest total reducing power. Furthermore, all the extracts were tested against two gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogene) and two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, k. pneumonia) bacteria by Kirby-Bauer standard disc diffusion method. Antibacterial effects of leaves extracts of bruceaantidysenterica showed different degrees of inhibition against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts showed higher antibacterial activity than petroleum ether extracts.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Determination of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Crude Extract of Bruceaantidysenterica Leaves
    AU  - Liyew Yizengaw Yitayih
    AU  - Thevabakthi Siluvai Muthu Arul Jeevan
    AU  - Solomon Libsu Bikilla
    AU  - Tesfahun Dagnaw Demelash
    Y1  - 2023/03/31
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13
    DO  - 10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13
    T2  - Modern Chemistry
    JF  - Modern Chemistry
    JO  - Modern Chemistry
    SP  - 34
    EP  - 42
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2329-180X
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.mc.20231101.13
    AB  - Bruceaantidysenterica (abalo in Amharic) is a medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine for treatment of several diseases and ailments. This study aimed to investigate the classes of the phytochemical constituents of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica extracted with the solvents of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The crud extract evaluated their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Qualitative phytochemical screening of the leaves of this plant indicated the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols, quinones, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, tannins and cumaroins. Quantitative analysis of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica revealed that the total phenolic content, expressed as gallic acid equivalent, ranged from 28.5 to 120.06 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. Likewise, the total flavonoid content of the extract, expressed as quercetin equivalent, varied from 26.05 to 83.663 mg/g of dry weight of extracts. All extracts showed antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. As seen from ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of the leaves of Bruceaantidysenterica showed the highest total reducing power while petroleum ether extract exhibited the lowest total reducing power. Furthermore, all the extracts were tested against two gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogene) and two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, k. pneumonia) bacteria by Kirby-Bauer standard disc diffusion method. Antibacterial effects of leaves extracts of bruceaantidysenterica showed different degrees of inhibition against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts showed higher antibacterial activity than petroleum ether extracts.
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Chemistry, College of Natural and Computational Science, MizanTepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia

  • Department of Chemistry, College of Natural and Computational Science, MizanTepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia

  • Department of Chemistry, College of Natural and Computational Science, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

  • Department of Chemistry, College of Natural and Computational Science, WolayitaSedo University, Wolayita, Ethiopia

  • Section