International Journal of Agricultural Economics

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Farmer’s Perception Towards Agricultural Lime Technology in the Case of Ejere District, West Shewa, Zone of Oromia Region, Ethiopia

Received: 11 October 2023    Accepted: 31 October 2023    Published: 17 November 2023
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Abstract

The purpose of the study is to find out how farmers perceive about agricultural lime technologies in some chosen kebeles within the districts of Ejere. This study examines farmers' opinions about lime technology were measured using a scale with items developed for the purpose of this study. A multistage sampling procedure was employed to draw 145 sample households from one woreda and three kebeles. Using a Likert type scale, sample respondents' responses to the perception were examined. According to the degree of agreement, the outcome showed that the perception on the statement lime treat (amend) soil acidity, improve crop yield, improve crop yield for consecutive years, reduce crop disease showed positive perception from the respondent Whereas, perception on the statement lime needs additional labor and time, technological availability and soil acidity testing service shows the lowest degree of agreement in relation to the other level of agreement parameters taken into consideration. Despite the fact that the study area's households benefit more from technology, It is discouraged for certain farmers to use the lime technology due to unavailability of the technology (lime shortage), unawareness about lime technology, transportation problem, labor shortage and a problem of soil acidity testing service were some of the elements influencing the study area's adoption of lime technology. Therefore, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and other stakeholders focused more on making better access to agricultural lime timely and needed to put in place infrastructural and policy support at different levels for technical interventions to address the problem of acid soils in general and in the study area in particular.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13
Published in International Journal of Agricultural Economics (Volume 8, Issue 6, November 2023)
Page(s) 245-250
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Lime, Likert Scale, Perception, Smallholder Farmers, Technology

References
[1] Pickens, Jeffrey. 2005. “Attitudes and Perceptions.” Organizational Behavior in Health Care 4 (7): 43–76.
[2] Mwangi, Margaret, and Samuel Kariuki. 2015. “Factors Determining Adoption of New Agricultural Technology by Smallholder Farmers in Developing Countries.” Issn 6 (5): 2222–1700. www.iiste.org.
[3] Adesina, Akinwumi A, and Jojo Baidu-Forson. 1995. “Farmers’ Perceptions and Adoption of New Agricultural Technology: Evidence from Analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa.” Agricultural Economics 13 (1): 1–9.
[4] Farrington, John, and Adrienne Martin. 1988. Farmer Participation in Agricultural Research: A Review of Concepts and Practices.
[5] Ban, A W Van den, and H S Hawkins. 1999. “Agricultural Extension 2nd Edition.” Malden, Mary Land: Blackwell Science Ltd.
[6] Douthwaite, Boru, J D H Keatinge, and J R Park. 2001. “Why Promising Technologies Fail: The Neglected Role of User Innovation during Adoption.” Research Policy 30 (5): 819–36.
[7] McRobert, Jencie, and Lauren Rickards. 2010. “Social Research: Insights into Farmers’ Conversion to No-till Farming Systems.” Extension Farming Systems Journal 6 (1): 43–52.
[8] Adesina, A. A., and S. Seidi. 1995. “Farmers’ Perceptions and Adoption of New Agricultural Technology: Analysis of Modern Mangrove Rice Varieties in Guinea Bissau.” Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture 34 (4): 358–71.
[9] Kilima, F T M, A J P Tarimo, F H Johnsen, S Mbaga, J Sesabo, J M Abdallah, and G Iranga. 2013. “The Impact of Agricultural Research on Poverty and Income Distribution: A Case Study of Selected On-Farm Research Projects at Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.” Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences 12 (1): 1–9.
[10] Beyene, Alemayehu Keba. 2019. “Perception of Farmers for Improved Maize Varieties on Local Maize Variety : The Case of Kiremu District, Western Oromia, Ethiopia.” Journal of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development 5 (2): 588–91.
[11] Westermann, Olaf, Wiebke Förch, Philip Thornton, Jana Körner, Laura Cramer, and Bruce Campbell. 2018. “Scaling up Agricultural Interventions: Case Studies of Climate-Smart Agriculture.” Agricultural Systems 165 (January): 283–93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agsy.2018.07.007.
[12] Sieber, Stefan, Srijna Jha, Amjath Babu Tharayil Shereef, Franziska Bringe, Wibke Crewett, Goetz Uckert, Severin Polreich, Tim Hycenth Ndah, Frieder Graef, and Klaus Mueller. 2015. “Integrated Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Practices to Enhance Climate Resilience in Morogoro, Tanzania.” Regional Environmental Change 15 (7): 1281–92. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0810-5.
[13] Shiferaw, Bekele A., Julius Okello, and Ratna V. Reddy. 2009. “Adoption and Adaptation of Natural Resource Management Innovations in Smallholder Agriculture: Reflections on Key Lessons and Best Practices.” Environment, Development and Sustainability 11 (3): 601–19. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-007-9132-1.
[14] Adesina, Akinwumi A, and Moses M Zinnah. 1993. “Technology Characteristics, Farmers’ Perceptions and Adoption Decisions: A Tobit Model Application in Sierra Leone.” Agricultural Economics 9 (4): 297–311.
[15] Chi, Truong Thi Ngoc, and Ryuichi Yamada. 2002. “Factors Affecting Farmers’ Adoption of Technologies in Farming System: A Case Study in Omon District, Can Tho Province, Mekong Delta.” Omonrice 10: 94–100.
[16] Gesare Timu, Anne, Richard Mulwa, Julius J Okello, and Mercy W Kamau. 2013. “The Role of Varietal Attributes on Adoption of Improved Seed Varieties. The Case of Sorghum in Kenya.”
[17] Muzari, Washington, Wirimayi Gatsi, and Shepherd Muvhunzi. 2012. “The Impacts of Technology Adoption on Smallholder Agricultural Productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review.” Journal of Sustainable Development 5 (8): 69.
[18] CSA (Central Statistical Agency). 2014. Report on Area and Production of Major Crops (Private Peasant Holdings, Meher Season). Agricultural Sample Survey 2113/14 (2006 E. C), Volume 1. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[19] Fanos Mekonnen. 2012. Zonal Diagnosis and Intervention Plan West Shoa, Oromia. LIVES Project. IRLI, AddisAbaba, Ethiopia.
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  • APA Style

    Amare, H. (2023). Farmer’s Perception Towards Agricultural Lime Technology in the Case of Ejere District, West Shewa, Zone of Oromia Region, Ethiopia. International Journal of Agricultural Economics, 8(6), 245-250. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13

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    ACS Style

    Amare, H. Farmer’s Perception Towards Agricultural Lime Technology in the Case of Ejere District, West Shewa, Zone of Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Int. J. Agric. Econ. 2023, 8(6), 245-250. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13

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    AMA Style

    Amare H. Farmer’s Perception Towards Agricultural Lime Technology in the Case of Ejere District, West Shewa, Zone of Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Int J Agric Econ. 2023;8(6):245-250. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13,
      author = {Hana Amare},
      title = {Farmer’s Perception Towards Agricultural Lime Technology in the Case of Ejere District, West Shewa, Zone of Oromia Region, Ethiopia},
      journal = {International Journal of Agricultural Economics},
      volume = {8},
      number = {6},
      pages = {245-250},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijae.20230806.13},
      abstract = {The purpose of the study is to find out how farmers perceive about agricultural lime technologies in some chosen kebeles within the districts of Ejere. This study examines farmers' opinions about lime technology were measured using a scale with items developed for the purpose of this study. A multistage sampling procedure was employed to draw 145 sample households from one woreda and three kebeles. Using a Likert type scale, sample respondents' responses to the perception were examined. According to the degree of agreement, the outcome showed that the perception on the statement lime treat (amend) soil acidity, improve crop yield, improve crop yield for consecutive years, reduce crop disease showed positive perception from the respondent Whereas, perception on the statement lime needs additional labor and time, technological availability and soil acidity testing service shows the lowest degree of agreement in relation to the other level of agreement parameters taken into consideration. Despite the fact that the study area's households benefit more from technology, It is discouraged for certain farmers to use the lime technology due to unavailability of the technology (lime shortage), unawareness about lime technology, transportation problem, labor shortage and a problem of soil acidity testing service were some of the elements influencing the study area's adoption of lime technology. Therefore, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and other stakeholders focused more on making better access to agricultural lime timely and needed to put in place infrastructural and policy support at different levels for technical interventions to address the problem of acid soils in general and in the study area in particular.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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    AU  - Hana Amare
    Y1  - 2023/11/17
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    JF  - International Journal of Agricultural Economics
    JO  - International Journal of Agricultural Economics
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    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijae.20230806.13
    AB  - The purpose of the study is to find out how farmers perceive about agricultural lime technologies in some chosen kebeles within the districts of Ejere. This study examines farmers' opinions about lime technology were measured using a scale with items developed for the purpose of this study. A multistage sampling procedure was employed to draw 145 sample households from one woreda and three kebeles. Using a Likert type scale, sample respondents' responses to the perception were examined. According to the degree of agreement, the outcome showed that the perception on the statement lime treat (amend) soil acidity, improve crop yield, improve crop yield for consecutive years, reduce crop disease showed positive perception from the respondent Whereas, perception on the statement lime needs additional labor and time, technological availability and soil acidity testing service shows the lowest degree of agreement in relation to the other level of agreement parameters taken into consideration. Despite the fact that the study area's households benefit more from technology, It is discouraged for certain farmers to use the lime technology due to unavailability of the technology (lime shortage), unawareness about lime technology, transportation problem, labor shortage and a problem of soil acidity testing service were some of the elements influencing the study area's adoption of lime technology. Therefore, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and other stakeholders focused more on making better access to agricultural lime timely and needed to put in place infrastructural and policy support at different levels for technical interventions to address the problem of acid soils in general and in the study area in particular.
    
    VL  - 8
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Author Information
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Holetta Agricultural Research Center (HARC), Holetta, Ethiopia

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