Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research

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Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé)

Received: Oct. 08, 2023    Accepted: Oct. 27, 2023    Published: Nov. 09, 2023
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Abstract

Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is a constellation of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities in patients with liver cirrhosis, apart from any underlying cardiac pathology, which potentially worsens the prognosis of these patients. The objectives of this study were to describe electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in cirrhotic patients and estimate the prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. This is a cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, carried out in hepato-gastroenterology department of the Campus University Teaching hospital of Lomé between July and December 2019, in adult patients hospitalized for liver cirrhosis. Of the 32 patients (men: 62.5%, mean age: 53.3 ± 13.5 years), the main causes of cirrhosis were viral hepatitis (40.6%) and alcoholic cirrhosis (25 %). Cirrhosis was classified Child-Pugh C in 62.5% of patients. The most common electrocardiographic abnormalities were prolonged QTc (59.4%), sinus tachycardia (31,2%), left atrial hypertrophy (25%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (12.5%). The main echocardiographic abnormalities were high cardiac output (68.8%) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (56.3%). The diagnostic criteria for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy were met in 37.5% of cases and it was more frequent in Child-Pugh C patients (66.7%) and in cirrhosis of alcoholic etiology (33.4%). Whatever the etiology of cirrhosis, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities were common. The prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy was high, hence the need for systematic cardiological assessment in these patients.

DOI 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13
Published in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research ( Volume 7, Issue 4, December 2023 )
Page(s) 82-87
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Liver Cirrhosis, Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy

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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Yayehd, K., Tcherou, T., Laté Lawson-Ananissoh, M., Defodji, A., Tchoua, E., et al. (2023). Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé). Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research, 7(4), 82-87. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13

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    ACS Style

    Yayehd, K.; Tcherou, T.; Laté Lawson-Ananissoh, M.; Defodji, A.; Tchoua, E., et al. Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé). Cardiol. Cardiovasc. Res. 2023, 7(4), 82-87. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13

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    AMA Style

    Yayehd K, Tcherou T, Laté Lawson-Ananissoh M, Defodji A, Tchoua E, et al. Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé). Cardiol Cardiovasc Res. 2023;7(4):82-87. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13,
      author = {Komlavi Yayehd and Tchaa Tcherou and Mawuli Laté Lawson-Ananissoh and Agossou Defodji and Eyana Tchoua and Soulemane Pessinaba and Wiyaou Dieudoné Kaziga and Soodogoua Baragou and Aklesso Bagny and Findibe Damorou},
      title = {Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé)},
      journal = {Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research},
      volume = {7},
      number = {4},
      pages = {82-87},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ccr.20230704.13},
      abstract = {Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is a constellation of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities in patients with liver cirrhosis, apart from any underlying cardiac pathology, which potentially worsens the prognosis of these patients. The objectives of this study were to describe electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in cirrhotic patients and estimate the prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. This is a cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, carried out in hepato-gastroenterology department of the Campus University Teaching hospital of Lomé between July and December 2019, in adult patients hospitalized for liver cirrhosis. Of the 32 patients (men: 62.5%, mean age: 53.3 ± 13.5 years), the main causes of cirrhosis were viral hepatitis (40.6%) and alcoholic cirrhosis (25 %). Cirrhosis was classified Child-Pugh C in 62.5% of patients. The most common electrocardiographic abnormalities were prolonged QTc (59.4%), sinus tachycardia (31,2%), left atrial hypertrophy (25%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (12.5%). The main echocardiographic abnormalities were high cardiac output (68.8%) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (56.3%). The diagnostic criteria for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy were met in 37.5% of cases and it was more frequent in Child-Pugh C patients (66.7%) and in cirrhosis of alcoholic etiology (33.4%). Whatever the etiology of cirrhosis, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities were common. The prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy was high, hence the need for systematic cardiological assessment in these patients.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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    T1  - Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities, and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy in Patients Hospitalized at the Campus University Hospital (Lomé)
    AU  - Komlavi Yayehd
    AU  - Tchaa Tcherou
    AU  - Mawuli Laté Lawson-Ananissoh
    AU  - Agossou Defodji
    AU  - Eyana Tchoua
    AU  - Soulemane Pessinaba
    AU  - Wiyaou Dieudoné Kaziga
    AU  - Soodogoua Baragou
    AU  - Aklesso Bagny
    AU  - Findibe Damorou
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    T2  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
    JF  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
    JO  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
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    EP  - 87
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2578-8914
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.13
    AB  - Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is a constellation of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities in patients with liver cirrhosis, apart from any underlying cardiac pathology, which potentially worsens the prognosis of these patients. The objectives of this study were to describe electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in cirrhotic patients and estimate the prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. This is a cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, carried out in hepato-gastroenterology department of the Campus University Teaching hospital of Lomé between July and December 2019, in adult patients hospitalized for liver cirrhosis. Of the 32 patients (men: 62.5%, mean age: 53.3 ± 13.5 years), the main causes of cirrhosis were viral hepatitis (40.6%) and alcoholic cirrhosis (25 %). Cirrhosis was classified Child-Pugh C in 62.5% of patients. The most common electrocardiographic abnormalities were prolonged QTc (59.4%), sinus tachycardia (31,2%), left atrial hypertrophy (25%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (12.5%). The main echocardiographic abnormalities were high cardiac output (68.8%) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (56.3%). The diagnostic criteria for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy were met in 37.5% of cases and it was more frequent in Child-Pugh C patients (66.7%) and in cirrhosis of alcoholic etiology (33.4%). Whatever the etiology of cirrhosis, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities were common. The prevalence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy was high, hence the need for systematic cardiological assessment in these patients.
    
    VL  - 7
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Author Information
  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kara, Kara, Togo

  • Department of Hepatogastroenterolgy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Hepatogastroenterolgy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo

  • Section