Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research

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The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients

Received: Sep. 18, 2023    Accepted: Oct. 10, 2023    Published: Oct. 28, 2023
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Abstract

Background: The incidence of coronary Heart Disease (CHD) has increased globally, including in Saudi Arabia. Consequently, the use of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, one of the most valuable solutions, has also increased. Common comorbidities (CMs) such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), peptic ulcer disease, dialysis-dependent renal failure, and obesity have been reported to adversely affect rehabilitation outcomes, increase hospital length of stay (LOS), and increase the cost of care for post-CABG surgery patients. Despite these facts, no previous studies have assessed the effect of comorbidities on Cardiac Rehabilitation outcomes, cost of care, and length of hospital stay in post-CABG surgery patients in the Saudi Population. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac comorbidities on the outcomes of CR intervention in CABG patients and examine how these comorbidities affect the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital, as well as the cost of care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to follow-up post-CABG patients over two years, from 2020 to 2022. A total of 62 male and female patients who met the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the CM size. Group I consisted of patients with (> 4 CMs), whereas Group II consisted of patients with (<3 CMs). Results: Group I had a higher mean score of comorbidities (CMs) at 5.09 ± 2.43, which resulted in longer stays in the ICU at 4.34 + 2.24 and in the hospital at 9.16 + 4.63 compared to Group II at 3.43 ± 1.48 and 7.2 ± 1.47, respectively. Group II had higher total cost of care. Conclusions: This study found that patients with multiple comorbidities such as DM, HTN, and dyslipidemia had longer hospital and ICU stays and higher care costs.

DOI 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12
Published in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research ( Volume 7, Issue 4, December 2023 )
Page(s) 75-81
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

CABG, Cardiac Rehabilitation, Comorbidity, Length of Stay, Cost of Care

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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Mohammed Takroni, Collins Ogbeivor, Nargis Mirza, Mohammed Al-Subaie, Mohammed Al-Zahrani. (2023). The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients . Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research, 7(4), 75-81. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12

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    ACS Style

    Mohammed Takroni; Collins Ogbeivor; Nargis Mirza; Mohammed Al-Subaie; Mohammed Al-Zahrani. The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients . Cardiol. Cardiovasc. Res. 2023, 7(4), 75-81. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12

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    AMA Style

    Mohammed Takroni, Collins Ogbeivor, Nargis Mirza, Mohammed Al-Subaie, Mohammed Al-Zahrani. The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients . Cardiol Cardiovasc Res. 2023;7(4):75-81. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12,
      author = {Mohammed Takroni and Collins Ogbeivor and Nargis Mirza and Mohammed Al-Subaie and Mohammed Al-Zahrani},
      title = {The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients
    
    	
    },
      journal = {Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research},
      volume = {7},
      number = {4},
      pages = {75-81},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ccr.20230704.12},
      abstract = {Background: The incidence of coronary Heart Disease (CHD) has increased globally, including in Saudi Arabia. Consequently, the use of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, one of the most valuable solutions, has also increased. Common comorbidities (CMs) such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), peptic ulcer disease, dialysis-dependent renal failure, and obesity have been reported to adversely affect rehabilitation outcomes, increase hospital length of stay (LOS), and increase the cost of care for post-CABG surgery patients. Despite these facts, no previous studies have assessed the effect of comorbidities on Cardiac Rehabilitation outcomes, cost of care, and length of hospital stay in post-CABG surgery patients in the Saudi Population. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac comorbidities on the outcomes of CR intervention in CABG patients and examine how these comorbidities affect the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital, as well as the cost of care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to follow-up post-CABG patients over two years, from 2020 to 2022. A total of 62 male and female patients who met the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the CM size. Group I consisted of patients with (> 4 CMs), whereas Group II consisted of patients with (<3 CMs). Results: Group I had a higher mean score of comorbidities (CMs) at 5.09 ± 2.43, which resulted in longer stays in the ICU at 4.34 + 2.24 and in the hospital at 9.16 + 4.63 compared to Group II at 3.43 ± 1.48 and 7.2 ± 1.47, respectively. Group II had higher total cost of care. Conclusions: This study found that patients with multiple comorbidities such as DM, HTN, and dyslipidemia had longer hospital and ICU stays and higher care costs.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - The Impact of Common Comorbidities on the Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Outcomes and Cost of Care for Post-CABG Surgery Patients
    
    	
    
    AU  - Mohammed Takroni
    AU  - Collins Ogbeivor
    AU  - Nargis Mirza
    AU  - Mohammed Al-Subaie
    AU  - Mohammed Al-Zahrani
    Y1  - 2023/10/28
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12
    T2  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
    JF  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
    JO  - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research
    SP  - 75
    EP  - 81
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2578-8914
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ccr.20230704.12
    AB  - Background: The incidence of coronary Heart Disease (CHD) has increased globally, including in Saudi Arabia. Consequently, the use of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, one of the most valuable solutions, has also increased. Common comorbidities (CMs) such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), peptic ulcer disease, dialysis-dependent renal failure, and obesity have been reported to adversely affect rehabilitation outcomes, increase hospital length of stay (LOS), and increase the cost of care for post-CABG surgery patients. Despite these facts, no previous studies have assessed the effect of comorbidities on Cardiac Rehabilitation outcomes, cost of care, and length of hospital stay in post-CABG surgery patients in the Saudi Population. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac comorbidities on the outcomes of CR intervention in CABG patients and examine how these comorbidities affect the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital, as well as the cost of care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to follow-up post-CABG patients over two years, from 2020 to 2022. A total of 62 male and female patients who met the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the CM size. Group I consisted of patients with (> 4 CMs), whereas Group II consisted of patients with (<3 CMs). Results: Group I had a higher mean score of comorbidities (CMs) at 5.09 ± 2.43, which resulted in longer stays in the ICU at 4.34 + 2.24 and in the hospital at 9.16 + 4.63 compared to Group II at 3.43 ± 1.48 and 7.2 ± 1.47, respectively. Group II had higher total cost of care. Conclusions: This study found that patients with multiple comorbidities such as DM, HTN, and dyslipidemia had longer hospital and ICU stays and higher care costs.
    
    VL  - 7
    IS  - 4
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Physical Rehabilitation Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  • Physical Rehabilitation Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  • Physical Rehabilitation Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  • Physical Rehabilitation Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  • Physical Rehabilitation Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital &Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  • Section