American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering

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Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract

Received: Jun. 20, 2023    Accepted: Jul. 13, 2023    Published: Sep. 27, 2023
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Abstract

Ethno medicine has been gaining popularity for years, yet there is still a vast amount of medicinal flora that remains undiscovered through research. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanol and water extract from the leaf of medicinal plant Aegle marmelos L. were investigated. The investigation was performed against three Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus pneumonia) and five Gram negative (Salmonella typhi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella sonnei) bacteria and eight fungi (T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, Penicilium sp, Fusarium species, Aspergillus niger and Mucor) by disc diffusion assay method. The lowest concentration of every extract considered as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for both test organisms. Statistical significance was determined with one-way ANOVA and the level of significance was P < 0.05. The water extract of leaves at the concentration of 600 μg/ disc showed the higher activity against S. typhi (13±0.1), and S. dysenteriae (15±0.2) than methanol extract. Methanol extract showed the higher activity against E. coli (18±0.1), V. parahaemolyticus (19±0.2) and S. pneumonia (15±0.3) than water extract. Methanol extract of A. marmelos leaf showed more susceptibility towards skin disease causing fungi like T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, than the non-skin disease causing fungi like Penicilium sp, Fusarium species and Mucor. The result implies that the both methanol and water extract of Aegle marmelos, L. has great potential for medicinal purposes due to its antimicrobial quality.

DOI 10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13
Published in American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering ( Volume 11, Issue 5, October 2023 )
Page(s) 75-78
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Antimicrobial Activity, Medicinal Plant, Aegle marmelos, Bacteria, Fungi

References
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    Shahanaz Khatun, Nasrin Ferdous. (2023). Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract. American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering, 11(5), 75-78. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13

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    ACS Style

    Shahanaz Khatun; Nasrin Ferdous. Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract. Am. J. BioSci. Bioeng. 2023, 11(5), 75-78. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13

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    AMA Style

    Shahanaz Khatun, Nasrin Ferdous. Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract. Am J BioSci Bioeng. 2023;11(5):75-78. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13,
      author = {Shahanaz Khatun and Nasrin Ferdous},
      title = {Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract},
      journal = {American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering},
      volume = {11},
      number = {5},
      pages = {75-78},
      doi = {10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.bio.20231105.13},
      abstract = {Ethno medicine has been gaining popularity for years, yet there is still a vast amount of medicinal flora that remains undiscovered through research. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanol and water extract from the leaf of medicinal plant Aegle marmelos L. were investigated. The investigation was performed against three Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus pneumonia) and five Gram negative (Salmonella typhi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella sonnei) bacteria and eight fungi (T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, Penicilium sp, Fusarium species, Aspergillus niger and Mucor) by disc diffusion assay method. The lowest concentration of every extract considered as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for both test organisms. Statistical significance was determined with one-way ANOVA and the level of significance was P  S. typhi (13±0.1), and S. dysenteriae (15±0.2) than methanol extract. Methanol extract showed the higher activity against E. coli (18±0.1), V. parahaemolyticus (19±0.2) and S. pneumonia (15±0.3) than water extract. Methanol extract of A. marmelos leaf showed more susceptibility towards skin disease causing fungi like T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, than the non-skin disease causing fungi like Penicilium sp, Fusarium species and Mucor. The result implies that the both methanol and water extract of Aegle marmelos, L. has great potential for medicinal purposes due to its antimicrobial quality.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Antimicrobial Activity of Aegle marmelos L. Leaf Extract
    AU  - Shahanaz Khatun
    AU  - Nasrin Ferdous
    Y1  - 2023/09/27
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13
    DO  - 10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13
    T2  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    JF  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    JO  - American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
    SP  - 75
    EP  - 78
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-5893
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.bio.20231105.13
    AB  - Ethno medicine has been gaining popularity for years, yet there is still a vast amount of medicinal flora that remains undiscovered through research. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanol and water extract from the leaf of medicinal plant Aegle marmelos L. were investigated. The investigation was performed against three Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus pneumonia) and five Gram negative (Salmonella typhi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella sonnei) bacteria and eight fungi (T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, Penicilium sp, Fusarium species, Aspergillus niger and Mucor) by disc diffusion assay method. The lowest concentration of every extract considered as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for both test organisms. Statistical significance was determined with one-way ANOVA and the level of significance was P  S. typhi (13±0.1), and S. dysenteriae (15±0.2) than methanol extract. Methanol extract showed the higher activity against E. coli (18±0.1), V. parahaemolyticus (19±0.2) and S. pneumonia (15±0.3) than water extract. Methanol extract of A. marmelos leaf showed more susceptibility towards skin disease causing fungi like T. mentagrophytes, M. canis, T. rubrum, E. floccosum, than the non-skin disease causing fungi like Penicilium sp, Fusarium species and Mucor. The result implies that the both methanol and water extract of Aegle marmelos, L. has great potential for medicinal purposes due to its antimicrobial quality.
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 5
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

  • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

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