Research & Development

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Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers

Received: Jan. 23, 2023    Accepted: Feb. 20, 2023    Published: Mar. 15, 2023
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Abstract

Thermal comfort in learning environments influences the student’s focus and learning productivity. This study aims to evaluate and compare the adaptive thermal comfort of schoolchildren and their teachers in naturally ventilated primary schools in some selected cities in Imo State Nigeria. To achieve these objectives, the study analyzed the data collected from 330 pupils and 44 teachers in six surveyed classrooms in two types of classroom buildings. The recorded data in the surveyed classrooms consisted of four environmental factors and two personal factors. At the same time, the subjects filled out the questionnaires asking them about thermal sensation and thermal preferences against the classrooms’ thermal requirements. The results of the measurements showed that the indoor mean air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity were 29.1°C, 71.2%, and 0.19m/s, respectively. The mean thermal sensation votes of the children were +0.16 while that of their teachers was +0.58. The preferred temperatures were 27.4°C and 29.4°C for the schoolchildren and the teachers, respectively. Furthermore, the comfort range of the students was between 25.8°C - 31.6°C, and that of the teachers was between 28.0°C - 29.9°C. Based on the results of this study conducted in primary school buildings located in warm and humid climates, the thermal comfort perception of children and adults differ. This information will serve as a guide to professionals in the built environment, especially architects when designing primary school buildings in the warm and humid climates.

DOI 10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15
Published in Research & Development ( Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2023 )
Page(s) 27-39
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Classrooms, Schoolchildren, Teachers, Temperature, Thermal Comfort

References
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[18] Karyono, T. H., & Delyuzir, R. D. (2016). Thermal comfort studies of primary school students in Tangerang, Indonesia. Proceedings of 9th Windsor Conference, Making Comfort Relevant opportunities of female and male high school students. Journal of Building Engineering, 101365.
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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Charles Munonye, Michael Ngobili, Chukwunonso Umeora, Ifebi Oluchi, Nkechi Maduka, et al. (2023). Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers. Research & Development, 4(1), 27-39. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15

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    ACS Style

    Charles Munonye; Michael Ngobili; Chukwunonso Umeora; Ifebi Oluchi; Nkechi Maduka, et al. Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers. Res. Dev. 2023, 4(1), 27-39. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15

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    AMA Style

    Charles Munonye, Michael Ngobili, Chukwunonso Umeora, Ifebi Oluchi, Nkechi Maduka, et al. Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers. Res Dev. 2023;4(1):27-39. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15

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  • @article{10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15,
      author = {Charles Munonye and Michael Ngobili and Chukwunonso Umeora and Ifebi Oluchi and Nkechi Maduka and Chijioke Onwuzuligbo},
      title = {Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers},
      journal = {Research & Development},
      volume = {4},
      number = {1},
      pages = {27-39},
      doi = {10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.rd.20230401.15},
      abstract = {Thermal comfort in learning environments influences the student’s focus and learning productivity. This study aims to evaluate and compare the adaptive thermal comfort of schoolchildren and their teachers in naturally ventilated primary schools in some selected cities in Imo State Nigeria. To achieve these objectives, the study analyzed the data collected from 330 pupils and 44 teachers in six surveyed classrooms in two types of classroom buildings. The recorded data in the surveyed classrooms consisted of four environmental factors and two personal factors. At the same time, the subjects filled out the questionnaires asking them about thermal sensation and thermal preferences against the classrooms’ thermal requirements. The results of the measurements showed that the indoor mean air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity were 29.1°C, 71.2%, and 0.19m/s, respectively. The mean thermal sensation votes of the children were +0.16 while that of their teachers was +0.58. The preferred temperatures were 27.4°C and 29.4°C for the schoolchildren and the teachers, respectively. Furthermore, the comfort range of the students was between 25.8°C - 31.6°C, and that of the teachers was between 28.0°C - 29.9°C. Based on the results of this study conducted in primary school buildings located in warm and humid climates, the thermal comfort perception of children and adults differ. This information will serve as a guide to professionals in the built environment, especially architects when designing primary school buildings in the warm and humid climates.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Comparative Analysis of Comfort Temperature of School Children and Their Teachers
    AU  - Charles Munonye
    AU  - Michael Ngobili
    AU  - Chukwunonso Umeora
    AU  - Ifebi Oluchi
    AU  - Nkechi Maduka
    AU  - Chijioke Onwuzuligbo
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    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15
    DO  - 10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15
    T2  - Research & Development
    JF  - Research & Development
    JO  - Research & Development
    SP  - 27
    EP  - 39
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2994-7057
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20230401.15
    AB  - Thermal comfort in learning environments influences the student’s focus and learning productivity. This study aims to evaluate and compare the adaptive thermal comfort of schoolchildren and their teachers in naturally ventilated primary schools in some selected cities in Imo State Nigeria. To achieve these objectives, the study analyzed the data collected from 330 pupils and 44 teachers in six surveyed classrooms in two types of classroom buildings. The recorded data in the surveyed classrooms consisted of four environmental factors and two personal factors. At the same time, the subjects filled out the questionnaires asking them about thermal sensation and thermal preferences against the classrooms’ thermal requirements. The results of the measurements showed that the indoor mean air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity were 29.1°C, 71.2%, and 0.19m/s, respectively. The mean thermal sensation votes of the children were +0.16 while that of their teachers was +0.58. The preferred temperatures were 27.4°C and 29.4°C for the schoolchildren and the teachers, respectively. Furthermore, the comfort range of the students was between 25.8°C - 31.6°C, and that of the teachers was between 28.0°C - 29.9°C. Based on the results of this study conducted in primary school buildings located in warm and humid climates, the thermal comfort perception of children and adults differ. This information will serve as a guide to professionals in the built environment, especially architects when designing primary school buildings in the warm and humid climates.
    VL  - 4
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

  • Department of Architecture, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Nigeria

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