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Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration

Received: Oct. 27, 2022    Accepted: Dec. 08, 2022    Published: Dec. 27, 2022
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Abstract

Despite the large area under cultivation, the mean yield of maize per hectare is low. Limited access to improved maize varieties is among the contributing factors for low productivity. Popularization of better performing maize varieties is important to solve these problems. Therefore, this study was undertaken to enhance the productivity of maize through pre-scaling up of early maturing and high yielding maize varieties with improved management practices at Harari region and Dire Dawa administration under AGP-II fund. It was conducted at Wahil from Dire Dawa and at Dodota as well as Kile kebeles from Harari region through cluster approach. A total of 100 Farmers were selected based on their interest and land ownership. Melkassa-2 and Melkassa-6 were provided to farmers with full packages. Each variety was planted on a plot size of 50mx50m/farmer, with seed rate of 25kg/ha and 75cm*25cm space between row and plant respectively. Likewise, fertilizer (NPS) was applied with rate of 100kg/ha. Training and field day were organized as a means to facilitate uptake and diffusion of technologies through farmers as well as to evaluate performance of the varieties and share the lessons with different stakeholders. The combined mean yield for melkasa-2 and melkasa-6 is 29.36qt/ha and 26.67qt/ha respectively. The mean score for knowledge test before and after implementation is 4.47 and 7.37 respectively. These results indicate an improvement in the awareness, production and productivity of beneficiary farmers. Therefore, it is better if respective bureau of agriculture and natural resource take the responsibility to exert their effort for wider scaling up of the technologies.

DOI 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15
Published in Research & Development ( Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2022 )
Page(s) 232-236
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Pre-Scaling Up, Cluster, Maize Varieties, Knowledge Test

References
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[2] CIMMYT (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center). 2004. Second Semi-Annual Progress Report for the QPM Development Project for Horn and East Africa. July 1- December 31, 2003.
[3] CSA (Central Statistical Agency). 2014. Agricultural Sample Survey: report on area and production of major crops (private peasant holdings, Meher season 2013/2014). Statistical Bulletin, volume1: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[4] CSA (Central Statistical Agency). 2015. Agricultural sample survey 2010/2011: report on area and production of crops (private peasant holdings, main season), vol. 1. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[5] CSA (Central Statistical Agency). 2021. Agricultural Sample Survey: report on area and production of major crops (private peasant holdings, Meher season 2020/2021). Statistical Bulletin 590, volume1: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[6] CSA (Central Statistics Agency). Report on area and production of crops of central statistics agency (2012) Central Statistics Agency, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[7] Dagne W (2016). Maize varieties and seed value chain challenges in Ethiopia. CIMMYT-Ethiopia.
[8] FAO (Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations). 2011. FAOSTAT online database, available at link http://faostat.fao.org/.
[9] FAOSTAT. 2013. Database of agricultural production. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Available at http://faostat.fao.org/default.aspx [accessed November 2021].
[10] Food and Agriculture Organization Corporate Statistical Database (FAOSTAT). 2020. Available at: http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QC
[11] Ignjatovic-Micic Dragan, Vancetovic J, Trbovic D, Dumanovic Z, Kostadinovic M, Bozinovic S (2015). Grain Nutrient Composition of Maize (Zea mays L.) Drought-Tolerant Populations. Agric. Food Chem. 63, 1251−1260. DOI: 10.1021/jf504301u.
[12] Mandefro N, Mohammed H, Sebokssa G, Bogale G, Beyene Y, Hailemichael S, Hadis A (2002). Maize improvement for drought stressed areas of Ethiopia. Proceedings of the Second National Maize Workshop of Ethiopia. Addis Ababa: Ethiopian Agricultural Research Institute (EARO), pp. 15-26.
[13] Ranum P, Pena-Rosas, JP, Garcia-Casal MN (2014). Global maize production, utilization, and consumption. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Issue: Technical Considerations for Maize Flour and Corn Meal Fortification in Public Health, 1312: 105–112.
[14] Rashid Shahidur, Kindie Getnet, and Solomon Lemma. 2010. Maize Value Chain Potential in Ethiopia: Constraints and opportunities for enhancing the system. International Food Policy Research Institute. 64p.
[15] Tilahun, B, Dida M, Deresa T Belay G, Girma D, Dejene K, Dagne W and Adefiris T. 2017. Combining ability analysis of quality protein maize (QPM) inbred lines for grain yield, agronomic traits and reaction to grey leaf spot in mid-altitude areas of Ethiopia. Afr. J. Agric. Res. Vol. 12 (20), pp1727-737.
[16] Tsedeke A., Bekele S., Abebe M., Dagne W., Yilma K., Kindie T., Menale K., Gezahegn B., Birhanu T. and Tolera K, 2015. Factors that transformed maize productivity in ethiopia. Food sec. DOI 10.1007/s12571-015-0488-z
[17] Aliyi I., Teha A., Siraj N., and Magersa O. 2021. Pre-Extension Demonstration and Evaluation of Melkassa Maize Varieties in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration. Inter. J. of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development Studies Vol. 8 (3), pp. 39-45.
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  • APA Style

    Bedasso Urgessa, Oromia Megersa, Abdulaziz Teha. (2022). Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration. Research & Development, 3(4), 232-236. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15

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    ACS Style

    Bedasso Urgessa; Oromia Megersa; Abdulaziz Teha. Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration. Res. Dev. 2022, 3(4), 232-236. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15

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    AMA Style

    Bedasso Urgessa, Oromia Megersa, Abdulaziz Teha. Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration. Res Dev. 2022;3(4):232-236. doi: 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15

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  • @article{10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15,
      author = {Bedasso Urgessa and Oromia Megersa and Abdulaziz Teha},
      title = {Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration},
      journal = {Research & Development},
      volume = {3},
      number = {4},
      pages = {232-236},
      doi = {10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.rd.20220304.15},
      abstract = {Despite the large area under cultivation, the mean yield of maize per hectare is low. Limited access to improved maize varieties is among the contributing factors for low productivity. Popularization of better performing maize varieties is important to solve these problems. Therefore, this study was undertaken to enhance the productivity of maize through pre-scaling up of early maturing and high yielding maize varieties with improved management practices at Harari region and Dire Dawa administration under AGP-II fund. It was conducted at Wahil from Dire Dawa and at Dodota as well as Kile kebeles from Harari region through cluster approach. A total of 100 Farmers were selected based on their interest and land ownership. Melkassa-2 and Melkassa-6 were provided to farmers with full packages. Each variety was planted on a plot size of 50mx50m/farmer, with seed rate of 25kg/ha and 75cm*25cm space between row and plant respectively. Likewise, fertilizer (NPS) was applied with rate of 100kg/ha. Training and field day were organized as a means to facilitate uptake and diffusion of technologies through farmers as well as to evaluate performance of the varieties and share the lessons with different stakeholders. The combined mean yield for melkasa-2 and melkasa-6 is 29.36qt/ha and 26.67qt/ha respectively. The mean score for knowledge test before and after implementation is 4.47 and 7.37 respectively. These results indicate an improvement in the awareness, production and productivity of beneficiary farmers. Therefore, it is better if respective bureau of agriculture and natural resource take the responsibility to exert their effort for wider scaling up of the technologies.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Cluster Based Improved Maize Technologies Popularization in Selected AGP-II Districts of Harari Region and Dire Dawa Administration
    AU  - Bedasso Urgessa
    AU  - Oromia Megersa
    AU  - Abdulaziz Teha
    Y1  - 2022/12/27
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    DO  - 10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15
    T2  - Research & Development
    JF  - Research & Development
    JO  - Research & Development
    SP  - 232
    EP  - 236
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2994-7057
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.rd.20220304.15
    AB  - Despite the large area under cultivation, the mean yield of maize per hectare is low. Limited access to improved maize varieties is among the contributing factors for low productivity. Popularization of better performing maize varieties is important to solve these problems. Therefore, this study was undertaken to enhance the productivity of maize through pre-scaling up of early maturing and high yielding maize varieties with improved management practices at Harari region and Dire Dawa administration under AGP-II fund. It was conducted at Wahil from Dire Dawa and at Dodota as well as Kile kebeles from Harari region through cluster approach. A total of 100 Farmers were selected based on their interest and land ownership. Melkassa-2 and Melkassa-6 were provided to farmers with full packages. Each variety was planted on a plot size of 50mx50m/farmer, with seed rate of 25kg/ha and 75cm*25cm space between row and plant respectively. Likewise, fertilizer (NPS) was applied with rate of 100kg/ha. Training and field day were organized as a means to facilitate uptake and diffusion of technologies through farmers as well as to evaluate performance of the varieties and share the lessons with different stakeholders. The combined mean yield for melkasa-2 and melkasa-6 is 29.36qt/ha and 26.67qt/ha respectively. The mean score for knowledge test before and after implementation is 4.47 and 7.37 respectively. These results indicate an improvement in the awareness, production and productivity of beneficiary farmers. Therefore, it is better if respective bureau of agriculture and natural resource take the responsibility to exert their effort for wider scaling up of the technologies.
    VL  - 3
    IS  - 4
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Fedis Agricultural Research Centre, Harar, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Fedis Agricultural Research Centre, Harar, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Fedis Agricultural Research Centre, Harar, Ethiopia

  • Section