Petroleum Science and Engineering

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Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery

Received: 8 January 2024    Accepted: 24 January 2024    Published: 29 February 2024
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Abstract

Polymer flooding is a chemical enhanced oil recovery where polymer is injected into the reservoir to recover oil that remained in the reservoir after the primary and secondary recovery mechanisms, improves oil recovery by reducing the water mobility ratio and increases the viscosity of the displacing fluids for sweep displacement efficiency of the reservoir. Synthetic polymers are widely used chemical enhanced oil recovery. However, there is a big concern about the high cost of these polymers which can result to high cost of oil production and environmental concerns due to the toxic nature of these polymers. Hence, there is need to source for local polymers that can be environmentally friendly, less expensive and can serve as a mobility control agent in enhanced oil recovery. In this study, experimental analysis was carried out to improve hydrocarbon productivity using local polymers such as Afzelia Africana, Colocasian esculenta and compared with synthetic polymer Hydroxyethyl cellulose. Characterization (FTIR and SEM) of these polymers were carried out to determine the functional groups and the morphology. Rheological behavior of these polymers was investigated. Core-flooding experiment was conducted on the local polymers and the synthetic polymer to examine the potential of these polymers in enhanced oil recovery. The results of the study showed that the samples contained hydroxyl group (OH), carboxyl group (COOH), and amine (NH3) based on the functional groups. The scanning electron microscopy test showed that the samples are mesoporous and crystalline in nature. The rheology test results showed that the samples exhibit shear thinning behavior and a non-Newtonian fluid. The core-flooding experiment showed that Afzelia Africana had oil recovery of 8.4%, 14.4% and 17.6%. More so, Colocasian esculenta had oil recovery of 6.8%, 14.0% and 17.2% while the synthetic polymer had oil recovery of 9.6%, 14.8% and 19.2% for different polymer concentrations of 0.2wt%, 0.3wt% and 0.4wt% respectively. The results from this study showed that the local polymers compared favorably with the synthetic polymer in enhanced oil recovery.

DOI 10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13
Published in Petroleum Science and Engineering (Volume 8, Issue 1, June 2024)
Page(s) 16-26
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Afzelia africana, Colocasian esculenta, Hydroxyethyl cellulose, Characterization, Core-Flooding

References
[1] Adibhatla, B., & Mohanty, K. K. (2018). Oil Recovery from Fractured Carbonates by Surfactant-Aided Gravity Drainage: Laboratory Experiments and Mechanistic Simulations. SPE Reservoir Evaluation & Engineering (11): pp. 119-130.
[2] Agi A., Radzuan J., Jeffrey G., & Onyekonwu M. (2018). Natural Polymer Flow Behavior in Porous Media for Enhanced Oil Recovery Applications: A Review. Journal of Petroleum Exploration and Production Technology. 8: pp 1349–1362. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13202-018-0434-7
[3] Agrawal A, & Satapathy A. (2019). Thermal, Mechanical, And Dielectric Properties of Aluminium Oxide and Solid Glass Microsphere-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Electronic Packaging Application Polym. Compos 9: 2573–2581.
[4] Al-Manasir N., & Kjøniksen A. L. (2009). Preparation and Characterization of Cross-Linked Polymeric Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oil Recovery Applications. Wiley, Amsterdam.
[5] Alvani A, & Jouyban A. (2019). The Effect of Surfactant and Polymer On Solution Stability And Solubility Of Tadalafil-Methyl Parabenco-Crystal. J. Mol. Liq. (281): pp 86–92.
[6] Coolman T. & Alexander D. (2020). An Evaluation of the Enhanced Oil Recovery Potential of the Xanthan Gum and Aquagel in a Heavy Oil Reservoir in Trinidad. J. Petrol. Explor. Prod. Technol. Pp 567-578.
[7] Ezell, R. G. & McCormick C. L. (2007). Electrolyte and pH Responsive Polyampholytes With Potential As Viscosity Control Agents In Enhanced Petroleum Recovery. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 104, pp 2812–2821.
[8] Fadairo A, Adeyemi G, Obioma O, & Adedapo A (2018). Formulation of bio-waste derived polymer and its application in enhanced oil recovery. In: SPE Nigerian annual international conference and exhibition, Lagos, Aug 2019.
[9] Gbadamosi, A. O., Junin, R., Manan, M. A., Agi, A., Oseh, J. O., & Usman, J., (2018). Effect of aluminium oxide nanoparticles on oilfield polyacrylamide: Rheology, interfacial tension, wettability and oil displacement studies. J. Mol. Liq. (296), pp 11-23.
[10] Green, D. W., and Willhite, G. P., (1998) Enhanced Oil Recovery, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Dallas.
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[12] Izuwa N. C., Ihekoronye K. K., Obah B. O., & Nnakaihe S. E. (2019). Evaluation of Low Salinity Polymer Flooding in the Niger Delta Oil Fields. Journal of Advanced Research in Petroleum Technology & Management, Volume 5, Issue 3, Pp. No. 17-38.
[13] Ojo T, & Fadairo A (2017). Effect of jatropha bio-surfactant on residual oil during enhanced oil recovery process. Int J Appl Eng Res 12(20): 10036–10042.
[14] Olajire, A. A., (2014). Review of ASP EOR (Alkaline Surfactant Polymer Enhanced Oil Recovery Technology in The Petroleum Industry: Prospects and Challenges. Energy 77, 963–982.
[15] Rashidi M. M., Keimanesh M. (2010). Characterization of SPN Pickering Emulsions for Application in Enhanced Oil Recovery. J. Ind. Eng. Chem. (54), 304–315.
[16] Rashidi, M., Blokhus, A. M., Skauge, A., (2010). Viscosity Study of Salt Tolerant Polymers. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 117, pp 1551–1557.
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[18] Sheng, J. J (2014). Polymer Flooding—Fundamentals and Field Cases. Enhanced Oil Recovery. Field Case Study. https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-38654 5-8.00003-8
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    Ekene, D. A., Nkechi, N. A., Uchechukwu, O. N., Kelechi, I. K., Nnaemeka, U. (2024). Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery. Petroleum Science and Engineering, 8(1), 16-26. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13

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    ACS Style

    Ekene, D. A.; Nkechi, N. A.; Uchechukwu, O. N.; Kelechi, I. K.; Nnaemeka, U. Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery. Pet. Sci. Eng. 2024, 8(1), 16-26. doi: 10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13

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    AMA Style

    Ekene DA, Nkechi NA, Uchechukwu ON, Kelechi IK, Nnaemeka U. Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery. Pet Sci Eng. 2024;8(1):16-26. doi: 10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13

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  • @article{10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13,
      author = {Daraojiaku Augustine Ekene and Nwachukwu Angela Nkechi and Okereke Ndubuisi Uchechukwu and Ihekoronye Kingsley Kelechi and Uwaezuoke Nnaemeka},
      title = {Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery},
      journal = {Petroleum Science and Engineering},
      volume = {8},
      number = {1},
      pages = {16-26},
      doi = {10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.pse.20240801.13},
      abstract = {Polymer flooding is a chemical enhanced oil recovery where polymer is injected into the reservoir to recover oil that remained in the reservoir after the primary and secondary recovery mechanisms, improves oil recovery by reducing the water mobility ratio and increases the viscosity of the displacing fluids for sweep displacement efficiency of the reservoir. Synthetic polymers are widely used chemical enhanced oil recovery. However, there is a big concern about the high cost of these polymers which can result to high cost of oil production and environmental concerns due to the toxic nature of these polymers. Hence, there is need to source for local polymers that can be environmentally friendly, less expensive and can serve as a mobility control agent in enhanced oil recovery. In this study, experimental analysis was carried out to improve hydrocarbon productivity using local polymers such as Afzelia Africana, Colocasian esculenta and compared with synthetic polymer Hydroxyethyl cellulose. Characterization (FTIR and SEM) of these polymers were carried out to determine the functional groups and the morphology. Rheological behavior of these polymers was investigated. Core-flooding experiment was conducted on the local polymers and the synthetic polymer to examine the potential of these polymers in enhanced oil recovery. The results of the study showed that the samples contained hydroxyl group (OH), carboxyl group (COOH), and amine (NH3) based on the functional groups. The scanning electron microscopy test showed that the samples are mesoporous and crystalline in nature. The rheology test results showed that the samples exhibit shear thinning behavior and a non-Newtonian fluid. The core-flooding experiment showed that Afzelia Africana had oil recovery of 8.4%, 14.4% and 17.6%. More so, Colocasian esculenta had oil recovery of 6.8%, 14.0% and 17.2% while the synthetic polymer had oil recovery of 9.6%, 14.8% and 19.2% for different polymer concentrations of 0.2wt%, 0.3wt% and 0.4wt% respectively. The results from this study showed that the local polymers compared favorably with the synthetic polymer in enhanced oil recovery.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Experimental Investigation of the Suitability of Afzelia africana and Colocasian esculenta as Alternative to Hydroxyethyl cellulose in Enhanced Oil Recovery
    AU  - Daraojiaku Augustine Ekene
    AU  - Nwachukwu Angela Nkechi
    AU  - Okereke Ndubuisi Uchechukwu
    AU  - Ihekoronye Kingsley Kelechi
    AU  - Uwaezuoke Nnaemeka
    Y1  - 2024/02/29
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13
    DO  - 10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13
    T2  - Petroleum Science and Engineering
    JF  - Petroleum Science and Engineering
    JO  - Petroleum Science and Engineering
    SP  - 16
    EP  - 26
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2640-4516
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.pse.20240801.13
    AB  - Polymer flooding is a chemical enhanced oil recovery where polymer is injected into the reservoir to recover oil that remained in the reservoir after the primary and secondary recovery mechanisms, improves oil recovery by reducing the water mobility ratio and increases the viscosity of the displacing fluids for sweep displacement efficiency of the reservoir. Synthetic polymers are widely used chemical enhanced oil recovery. However, there is a big concern about the high cost of these polymers which can result to high cost of oil production and environmental concerns due to the toxic nature of these polymers. Hence, there is need to source for local polymers that can be environmentally friendly, less expensive and can serve as a mobility control agent in enhanced oil recovery. In this study, experimental analysis was carried out to improve hydrocarbon productivity using local polymers such as Afzelia Africana, Colocasian esculenta and compared with synthetic polymer Hydroxyethyl cellulose. Characterization (FTIR and SEM) of these polymers were carried out to determine the functional groups and the morphology. Rheological behavior of these polymers was investigated. Core-flooding experiment was conducted on the local polymers and the synthetic polymer to examine the potential of these polymers in enhanced oil recovery. The results of the study showed that the samples contained hydroxyl group (OH), carboxyl group (COOH), and amine (NH3) based on the functional groups. The scanning electron microscopy test showed that the samples are mesoporous and crystalline in nature. The rheology test results showed that the samples exhibit shear thinning behavior and a non-Newtonian fluid. The core-flooding experiment showed that Afzelia Africana had oil recovery of 8.4%, 14.4% and 17.6%. More so, Colocasian esculenta had oil recovery of 6.8%, 14.0% and 17.2% while the synthetic polymer had oil recovery of 9.6%, 14.8% and 19.2% for different polymer concentrations of 0.2wt%, 0.3wt% and 0.4wt% respectively. The results from this study showed that the local polymers compared favorably with the synthetic polymer in enhanced oil recovery.
    
    VL  - 8
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), Owerri, Nigeria

  • Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), Owerri, Nigeria

  • Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), Owerri, Nigeria

  • Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), Owerri, Nigeria

  • Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology Owerri (FUTO), Owerri, Nigeria

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