Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere

Received: 26 October 2022    Accepted: 9 November 2022    Published: 14 November 2022
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Abstract

The use of high-power lasers in the industry has been rapidly advanced by incorporating flexible-fiber-based beam delivery. In order to deliver high-power laser beam to a distant place, the laser beam must propagate through the atmosphere. When the laser beam propagates through a medium, a fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the medium. This absorbed power heats the medium and alters the index of refraction of the path, and leads to a distortion of the beam itself. This phenomenon is called thermal blooming. Thermal blooming at λ0 = 1.08 μm is caused by the absorption of water vapor. In this article, high-power laser beam propagation in a slightly wet atmosphere at λ0 = 1.08 μm was theoretically investigated. At First, the absorption coefficient (α) of air at 10% relative humidity was estimated. Then, simulation of thermal blooming of Gaussian laser beam with an initial power of 1 kW and a radius of 5 mm was conducted using this α. Under the condition of no wind, the beam intensity decreases rapidly with increasing length z. At z = 16 m, the intensity of laser beam became 1/5 of the initial intensity at z = 0 m. When laser beam propagated in the moist air with transverse air flow, thermal distortion of the beam was not symmetrical around the z axis because of the asymmetry introduced by the one-dimensional wind velocity v. Under the condition of calm uniform wind with v = 0.05 m/s, laser beams propagated only 25 to 30 m at most without damaging the initial beam shape. On the other hand, the beams propagated 65 to 70 m at most without beam-shape deformation under the condition of light uniform wind with v = 0.5 m/s.

DOI 10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11
Published in Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (Volume 10, Issue 6, December 2022)
Page(s) 215-222
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Laser Beam Propagation, Moist Atmosphere, Thermal Blooming

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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Yoshito Shuto. (2022). High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere. Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, 10(6), 215-222. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11

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    Yoshito Shuto. High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere. J. Electr. Electron. Eng. 2022, 10(6), 215-222. doi: 10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11

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    AMA Style

    Yoshito Shuto. High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere. J Electr Electron Eng. 2022;10(6):215-222. doi: 10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11,
      author = {Yoshito Shuto},
      title = {High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere},
      journal = {Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering},
      volume = {10},
      number = {6},
      pages = {215-222},
      doi = {10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.jeee.20221006.11},
      abstract = {The use of high-power lasers in the industry has been rapidly advanced by incorporating flexible-fiber-based beam delivery. In order to deliver high-power laser beam to a distant place, the laser beam must propagate through the atmosphere. When the laser beam propagates through a medium, a fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the medium. This absorbed power heats the medium and alters the index of refraction of the path, and leads to a distortion of the beam itself. This phenomenon is called thermal blooming. Thermal blooming at λ0 = 1.08 μm is caused by the absorption of water vapor. In this article, high-power laser beam propagation in a slightly wet atmosphere at λ0 = 1.08 μm was theoretically investigated. At First, the absorption coefficient (α) of air at 10% relative humidity was estimated. Then, simulation of thermal blooming of Gaussian laser beam with an initial power of 1 kW and a radius of 5 mm was conducted using this α. Under the condition of no wind, the beam intensity decreases rapidly with increasing length z. At z = 16 m, the intensity of laser beam became 1/5 of the initial intensity at z = 0 m. When laser beam propagated in the moist air with transverse air flow, thermal distortion of the beam was not symmetrical around the z axis because of the asymmetry introduced by the one-dimensional wind velocity v. Under the condition of calm uniform wind with v = 0.05 m/s, laser beams propagated only 25 to 30 m at most without damaging the initial beam shape. On the other hand, the beams propagated 65 to 70 m at most without beam-shape deformation under the condition of light uniform wind with v = 0.5 m/s.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - High-Power Laser Beam Propagation in Slightly Wet Atmosphere
    AU  - Yoshito Shuto
    Y1  - 2022/11/14
    PY  - 2022
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11
    T2  - Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    JF  - Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    JO  - Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    SP  - 215
    EP  - 222
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2329-1605
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jeee.20221006.11
    AB  - The use of high-power lasers in the industry has been rapidly advanced by incorporating flexible-fiber-based beam delivery. In order to deliver high-power laser beam to a distant place, the laser beam must propagate through the atmosphere. When the laser beam propagates through a medium, a fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the medium. This absorbed power heats the medium and alters the index of refraction of the path, and leads to a distortion of the beam itself. This phenomenon is called thermal blooming. Thermal blooming at λ0 = 1.08 μm is caused by the absorption of water vapor. In this article, high-power laser beam propagation in a slightly wet atmosphere at λ0 = 1.08 μm was theoretically investigated. At First, the absorption coefficient (α) of air at 10% relative humidity was estimated. Then, simulation of thermal blooming of Gaussian laser beam with an initial power of 1 kW and a radius of 5 mm was conducted using this α. Under the condition of no wind, the beam intensity decreases rapidly with increasing length z. At z = 16 m, the intensity of laser beam became 1/5 of the initial intensity at z = 0 m. When laser beam propagated in the moist air with transverse air flow, thermal distortion of the beam was not symmetrical around the z axis because of the asymmetry introduced by the one-dimensional wind velocity v. Under the condition of calm uniform wind with v = 0.05 m/s, laser beams propagated only 25 to 30 m at most without damaging the initial beam shape. On the other hand, the beams propagated 65 to 70 m at most without beam-shape deformation under the condition of light uniform wind with v = 0.5 m/s.
    VL  - 10
    IS  - 6
    ER  - 

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