Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

| Peer-Reviewed |

Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia

Received: Jun. 17, 2023    Accepted: Jul. 31, 2023    Published: Sep. 08, 2023
Views:       Downloads:

Share

Abstract

Adaptation performance field experiment on irrigated cotton cultivars for high productivity for large scale production and economic advantage were conducted in RCB Design by replicating four times to identify the high yielding with high quality cotton cultivar using surface irrigation at Tendaho sugar estate. All collected data were analyzed using GenStat 17th Edition software and mean comparisons among treatment means were made by LSD (5%). Cotton quality comparisons were also done based on the national quality measurement standards and the cotton quality laboratory analysis was done in Cotton Central accredited laboratory of Ethiopia under Ethiopian Textile Development and Research Institute. Significant difference (p<0.05) among the tested cotton cultivars were reported for stand count (SC), number of unopened balls per plant and percent of 65 percent opened ball. However, there were no significant variability for total cotton yield (Y (kg/ha), lint yield and moisture adjusted yield (MoiAd_Y_Qt_Ha) at (p<0.05) significance level. From the candidate cultivars, woyito and worer shown first and second high cotton productivity with 32 and 31.1 qt/ha cotton yield respectively followed by Stam-9-A as third with 30 qt/ha. In the other case, Stam-9-A and Delta ranked first for the major cotton quality standard measures. From this, it can be concluded that candidate genotype Stam-9-A which is third in productivity and first in cotton quality could have better advantage for the Estate. Therefore, based on the current adaptation trail result candidate cultivar Stam-9-A is recommended for commercial production in the study farm area.

DOI 10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13
Published in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology ( Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2023 )
Page(s) 67-73
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Adaptation, Cotton, Cultivar, Quality, Yield

References
[1] FAO, 2011. The state of food and agriculture. Women in Agriculture. Closing the Gender gap for Development.
[2] Feeding Africa, 2015. Action Plan for African Agricultural Transformation, United Nations Economic Commission of Africa, Conference Background Paper, Cereal Crops, Harold Macauley, Director General of Africa Rice and Tabo Ramadjita, ICRISAT, 21-23 October 2015, Dakar Senegal.
[3] Nicole Mason et al, 2012. Wheat Consumption in Sub-Saharan Africa: Trends, Drivers, and Policy Implications, MSU International Development Working Paper 127, December 2012.
[4] Acquaah, G. 2007. Principles of Plant Genetics and Breeding, 2nd edition. Garsington Road, Oxford 0X42 DQ, UK.
[5] Baffes, J. 2004. Cotton market setting, trade policies, and issue. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 3218; Washington DC.
[6] Melesse, Z., Mohammed, A., Mezgebu, A. and Habtamu, M. 2019. Cotton production and marketing trend in Ethiopia: Cotton production and marketing trend in Ethiopia, Cogent Food and Agriculture, 5: 1, 1691812.
[7] Merdasa Balcha, Nurhussien Seid, Yonas Bekele, Michael Kebede, Donis Gurmessa, Zemedkun Alemu, Samuel Damtew, Arkebe G/egziabher, Seleshi Getahun, Fikremariam Tegegn, Mekashaw Arega and Tamiru Dejen. 2022. Cotton Production Guideline in Ethiopia. Werer Agricultural Research Center (WARC), Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ISBN978-99944-3-509-8 ©EIAR, 2022 Webpage: http://www.eiar.gov.et Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[8] Alebel, B., Firew, B., Berihu, A. and Mezgebe, M. 2014. An institutional assessment of the cotton and sugarcane commodities in Ethiopia. The climate change perspective. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI). [Google Scholar].
[9] FAO, 2012. Crop yield response to water. FAO irrigation and drainage paper No. 66. Rome.
[10] EIA (Ethiopian Investment Agency). 2012. Investment opportunity profile for cotton production and ginning In Ethiopia. Updated Report on Cotton Ginning. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. doi: 10.1094/PDIS-11-11-0999-PDN [Crossref]. [Google Scholar].
[11] Bosena, T., Bekabil, F., Gebremedhin, B. and Hoekstra D. 2011. Factors affecting cotton supply at the farm level in Metema district of Ethiopia. Journal of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Ecology, 4 (1): 41-51.
[12] Global Agricultural Information Network, GAIN, 2012. “Ban on Cotton Exports Lifted,” GAIN Report Number: ET 1204, Addis Ababa.
[13] Adaptation and Promotion of Selected Cereal and Forage Crops in Newly Established Sugar Estates Ethiopian Agricultural Research Council Secretariat, July 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[14] Bedane G. and Arkebe G. 2019. Cotton production potential areas, production trends, research status, gaps and future directions of cotton improvement in Ethiopia. Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences 9 (2): 163-170, http://doi.org/10.15580/GJAS.2019.2.040619064.
[15] Cochran, W. G. and Cox, G. M., 1957. Experimental Designs. New York: Wiley.
Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Zinaw Dilnesaw, Welday Gebreegziabher, Tesfay Hailu, Fikadu Abdisa, Abiy Getaneh, et al. (2023). Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 8(3), 67-73. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13

    Copy | Download

    ACS Style

    Zinaw Dilnesaw; Welday Gebreegziabher; Tesfay Hailu; Fikadu Abdisa; Abiy Getaneh, et al. Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia. Ecol. Evol. Biol. 2023, 8(3), 67-73. doi: 10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13

    Copy | Download

    AMA Style

    Zinaw Dilnesaw, Welday Gebreegziabher, Tesfay Hailu, Fikadu Abdisa, Abiy Getaneh, et al. Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia. Ecol Evol Biol. 2023;8(3):67-73. doi: 10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13

    Copy | Download

  • @article{10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13,
      author = {Zinaw Dilnesaw and Welday Gebreegziabher and Tesfay Hailu and Fikadu Abdisa and Abiy Getaneh and Mohamed Berhie},
      title = {Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia},
      journal = {Ecology and Evolutionary Biology},
      volume = {8},
      number = {3},
      pages = {67-73},
      doi = {10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.j.eeb.20230803.13},
      abstract = {Adaptation performance field experiment on irrigated cotton cultivars for high productivity for large scale production and economic advantage were conducted in RCB Design by replicating four times to identify the high yielding with high quality cotton cultivar using surface irrigation at Tendaho sugar estate. All collected data were analyzed using GenStat 17th Edition software and mean comparisons among treatment means were made by LSD (5%). Cotton quality comparisons were also done based on the national quality measurement standards and the cotton quality laboratory analysis was done in Cotton Central accredited laboratory of Ethiopia under Ethiopian Textile Development and Research Institute. Significant difference (p<0.05) among the tested cotton cultivars were reported for stand count (SC), number of unopened balls per plant and percent of 65 percent opened ball. However, there were no significant variability for total cotton yield (Y (kg/ha), lint yield and moisture adjusted yield (MoiAd_Y_Qt_Ha) at (p<0.05) significance level. From the candidate cultivars, woyito and worer shown first and second high cotton productivity with 32 and 31.1 qt/ha cotton yield respectively followed by Stam-9-A as third with 30 qt/ha. In the other case, Stam-9-A and Delta ranked first for the major cotton quality standard measures. From this, it can be concluded that candidate genotype Stam-9-A which is third in productivity and first in cotton quality could have better advantage for the Estate. Therefore, based on the current adaptation trail result candidate cultivar Stam-9-A is recommended for commercial production in the study farm area.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

    Copy | Download

  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Adaptation Verification of Irrigated Cotton Cultivars for High Productivity and Economic Advantage for Large Scale Production at Tendaho Sugar Estate, Ethiopia
    AU  - Zinaw Dilnesaw
    AU  - Welday Gebreegziabher
    AU  - Tesfay Hailu
    AU  - Fikadu Abdisa
    AU  - Abiy Getaneh
    AU  - Mohamed Berhie
    Y1  - 2023/09/08
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13
    DO  - 10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13
    T2  - Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
    JF  - Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
    JO  - Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
    SP  - 67
    EP  - 73
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-3762
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.eeb.20230803.13
    AB  - Adaptation performance field experiment on irrigated cotton cultivars for high productivity for large scale production and economic advantage were conducted in RCB Design by replicating four times to identify the high yielding with high quality cotton cultivar using surface irrigation at Tendaho sugar estate. All collected data were analyzed using GenStat 17th Edition software and mean comparisons among treatment means were made by LSD (5%). Cotton quality comparisons were also done based on the national quality measurement standards and the cotton quality laboratory analysis was done in Cotton Central accredited laboratory of Ethiopia under Ethiopian Textile Development and Research Institute. Significant difference (p<0.05) among the tested cotton cultivars were reported for stand count (SC), number of unopened balls per plant and percent of 65 percent opened ball. However, there were no significant variability for total cotton yield (Y (kg/ha), lint yield and moisture adjusted yield (MoiAd_Y_Qt_Ha) at (p<0.05) significance level. From the candidate cultivars, woyito and worer shown first and second high cotton productivity with 32 and 31.1 qt/ha cotton yield respectively followed by Stam-9-A as third with 30 qt/ha. In the other case, Stam-9-A and Delta ranked first for the major cotton quality standard measures. From this, it can be concluded that candidate genotype Stam-9-A which is third in productivity and first in cotton quality could have better advantage for the Estate. Therefore, based on the current adaptation trail result candidate cultivar Stam-9-A is recommended for commercial production in the study farm area.
    VL  - 8
    IS  - 3
    ER  - 

    Copy | Download

Author Information
  • Sugar Corporation, Research and Development Center, Wonji, Ethiopia

  • Sugar Corporation, Research and Development Center, Wonji, Ethiopia

  • Sugar Corporation, Research and Development Center, Wonji, Ethiopia

  • Sugar Corporation, Research and Development Center, Wonji, Ethiopia

  • Sugar Corporation, Research and Development Center, Wonji, Ethiopia

  • Afar Region Pastoralists and Semi-pastoralist Agricultural Research, Semera, Ethiopia

  • Section