Study of Serum Levels of Trace Elements (Selenium, Copper, Zinc, and Iron) in Breast Cancer Patients
International Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research
Volume 2, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 82-85
Received: Jul. 2, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 13, 2017; Published: Aug. 15, 2017
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Authors
Tehseen Hassan, Department of Biochemistry, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar, India
Wasim Qureshi, Registrar Academics, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar, India
Showkat Ahmad Bhat, Department of Biochemistry, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar, India
Sabhiya Majid, Department of Biochemistry, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar, India
Manzoor R. Mir, Division of Vety. Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, & Animal Husbandry, SKAUST-K, Shuhama, Srinagar, India
Purnima Shrivastava, Director Research, Bhagwant University, Sikar Road Ajmer, Rajasthan, India
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Abstract
Purpose: Malignancy of the breast is one of the commonest causes of death in women aged between 40-45 years. The aim of this study was to carry out a comparative study to investigate the effect of minerals on the risk of a woman developing breast cancer. Materials and methods: Three hundred blood samples were used to analyze the status of concentration of Selenium (Se), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe) in breast cancer (BC) patients and healthy individuals by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results: There was a significant (p<0.05) decline in the concentration of Se in serum samples of BC patients as on comparison with the healthy individuals. Concentration of Cu of BC patients was increased significantly (p<0.05) on comparison with the healthy individuals. There was a significant (p<0.05) decline in the concentration of Zn in BC patients on comparison with the healthy individuals. Level of difference of Fe remain insignificant (p>0.05) in serum of BC patients. There was a significant decline in the concentration of Se and Zn while high level of serum copper in breast cancer patients, as compared with normal healthy controls. Conclusion: We found a significant association between trace elements (serum selenium, zinc and copper) with breast cancer.
Keywords
Breast Cancer (BC), Serum Minerals, Selenium (Se), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe)
To cite this article
Tehseen Hassan, Wasim Qureshi, Showkat Ahmad Bhat, Sabhiya Majid, Manzoor R. Mir, Purnima Shrivastava, Study of Serum Levels of Trace Elements (Selenium, Copper, Zinc, and Iron) in Breast Cancer Patients, International Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2017, pp. 82-85. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcocr.20170204.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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