Effect of Black Tea on Micronuclei (Oral Cancer Biomarker) Among Indian Population
International Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research
Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017, Pages: 7-9
Received: Dec. 10, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 3, 2017; Published: Feb. 27, 2017
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Authors
Aniket Adhikari, Department of Genetics, Vivekananda Institute of Medical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Seva Pratishthan, Kolkata, India
Madhusnata De, Department of Genetics, Vivekananda Institute of Medical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Seva Pratishthan, Kolkata, India
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Abstract
Introduction Tea is the most widely consumed beverage worldwide and important agricultural product. Being rich in natural antioxidants, tea is used in the management of different types of cancers including oral cavity. Micronuclei (MN) act as a biomarker for oral cancer. These are small, extra nuclear bodies that are formed during mitosis from lagging chromosomes. The micronucleus test is used as a tool for genotoxicity. In this present study subjects were screened from Department of E. N. T. & Oral and Maxillofacial surgery of RKMSP hospital, Kolkata and different areas of Eastern and North Eastern states of India. Exfoliated cell were examined from buccal mucosa for MN. Percentage of MN was low after black tea supplementation. We can concluded that betel quid has an immense role in changing the oral pathology and tea has chemo preventive property.
Keywords
Black Tea, Cancer, Polyphenols, Micronuclei, Betel Quid
To cite this article
Aniket Adhikari, Madhusnata De, Effect of Black Tea on Micronuclei (Oral Cancer Biomarker) Among Indian Population, International Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 7-9. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcocr.20170201.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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