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Age Related Cognitive Impairment and Physical Disability to Measure Quality of Life (QoL) Using PSCQL-MT Tool in the Senior Citizens of Lahore, Pakistan
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 8, Issue 5, October 2020, Pages: 173-184
Received: Aug. 15, 2020; Accepted: Aug. 26, 2020; Published: Sep. 16, 2020
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Authors
Hamid Mahmood, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Ammara Waqar, Quality Enhancement Cell, Al-Aleem Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan
Muhammad Yaqoob, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Ejaz Mahmood Ahmad Qureshi, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Saleem Rana, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Syed Amir Gilani, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Asif Hanif, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Awais Gohar, Primary and Secondary Health Department, Government of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
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Abstract
The impact of physical exercise activity and cognitive executive functions and their impact on the QoL is of great importance in performing ADL and IADL in the senior citizens. This study will provide an inside into multidimensional factors which can impact the cognitive and physical mobility of the persons in the old age. Moreover, it is also desirable to measure the QoL on the basis of PSCQL-MT on a larger scale for longer duration of time. The role of gender on the QoL using different variables needs to be further evaluated. The objectives of the study are: To find out the relationship between the cognitive improvement due to physical exercise activities in the elderly persons. To find out the effect of different variables on QoL in male and female. The following hypothesis will be tested based on PSCQL-MT questionnaire. H1: Physical exercise activities play an important role in stabilizing or improving the cognitive functions on the basis of gender in the study population. H2: Physical exercise activities do not play an important role in stabilizing or improving the cognitive functions on the basis of gender in the study population. The result of the study showed that recent physical exercise activity does not play any significant role in improving the QoL. The cognitive functions in the senior citizens who perform ADL and IADL depend upon the physical mobility and mental ability for the persons. The long term physical exercise activity, socio-cultural level, lifestyle, leisure activities and health behavior play a significant in maintaining the cognitive functions and physical health in the senior citizens. The scope of this study was to find out the moderating factors which can preserve cognitive executive functions in the senior citizens. Our study is more related on the concept of physical exercise activities and its impact on the cognitive executive functions in the elderly. The PSCQL-MT questionnaire contains all the dimensions which are necessary to find out the relationship of physical activities and cognitive functions in terms of ADL and IADL. The PSCQL-MT questionnaire and the modified questionnaires are very closed in terms of their dimensions. We concluded from the study that physical exercise activity in the long term is very important in preserving the cognitive functions in the elderly persons. We also found out that the PSCQL-MT questionnaire is a good addition to conduct research on the different aspects of healthy living in the different population.
Keywords
Physical Exercise Activity, Cognitive Functions, PSCQL-MT, Measurement Tool, Quality of Life (QoL), Senior Citizen
To cite this article
Hamid Mahmood, Ammara Waqar, Muhammad Yaqoob, Ejaz Mahmood Ahmad Qureshi, Saleem Rana, Syed Amir Gilani, Asif Hanif, Awais Gohar, Age Related Cognitive Impairment and Physical Disability to Measure Quality of Life (QoL) Using PSCQL-MT Tool in the Senior Citizens of Lahore, Pakistan, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 5, 2020, pp. 173-184. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20200805.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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