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Development, Testing of Construct Validity and Reliability of Pakistan Senior Citizens Quality of Life- Measurement Tool (PSCQL-MT)
American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume 8, Issue 5, October 2020, Pages: 156-172
Received: Aug. 15, 2020; Accepted: Aug. 26, 2020; Published: Sep. 16, 2020
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Authors
Hamid Mahmood, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Ammara Waqar, Quality Enhancement Cell, Al-Aleem Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan
Syed Amir Gilani, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Muhammad Yaqoob, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Ejaz Mahmood Ahmad Qureshi, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Saleem Rana, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Asif Hanif, University Institute of Public Health, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
Awais Gohar, Primary and Secondary Health Department, Government of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
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Abstract
This study has been dedicated to design, create and validate of quality of life (QoL) questionnaire called as (PSCQL-MT). This tool has been developed to measure physical activities, social relationship, cognitive aging, leisure activities and health behaviours. The objective of the study is to Develop, Test of Construct validity and reliability of (PSCQL-MT) to measure Quality of Life (QoL) in Senior Citizens of Lahore, Pakistan. Temporal stability was measured using the test-retest method. The overall questionnaire score shows an ICC of.86 (p <.001) with a 95% confidence interval (CI)=[.83-.89]. Analyses by dimensions range from a CCI of.72 (p <.001) with a 95% CI=[.66-.76] for the "other leisure activities" dimension to a CCI of.87 (p <.001) with a 95% CI=[.84-.89] for the "social activities" dimension. There was no specific valid questionnaire available in Pakistan to evaluate the individual and overall QoL in Pakistan. For this purpose, a reliable and valid construct questionnaire needs to be developed. This study has developed a tool that can measure 5 major variables which determine the QoL It has been concluded from the study that the development of PSCQL-MT questionnaire and valid tool is a great achievement to carry out research on the QoL in the study population.
Keywords
PSCQL-MT, Quality of Life (QoL), Measurement Tool, Development, Testing, Reliability, Validity, Senior Citizen, Physical Exercise Activity, Cognitive Aging
To cite this article
Hamid Mahmood, Ammara Waqar, Syed Amir Gilani, Muhammad Yaqoob, Ejaz Mahmood Ahmad Qureshi, Saleem Rana, Asif Hanif, Awais Gohar, Development, Testing of Construct Validity and Reliability of Pakistan Senior Citizens Quality of Life- Measurement Tool (PSCQL-MT), American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 5, 2020, pp. 156-172. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20200805.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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