Prevalence and Determinants of Malnutrition Among Schoolchildren in Primary Schools in the Communes of Dixinn, Matam and Matoto, Conakry, Guinea, 2016
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2018, Pages: 38-47
Received: Feb. 19, 2018; Accepted: Mar. 19, 2018; Published: Apr. 14, 2018
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Authors
Touré Abdoulaye, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea; Center of Research and Training of Infectious Diseases, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea; National Institute of Public Health, Ministry of Public Health, Conakry, Guinea
Kadio Kadio Jean-Jacques Olivier, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Camara Alioune, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Sidibé Sidikiba, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Delamou Alexandre, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Kotchi Yao Emmanuel, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Barry Ibrahima Koolo, Institute of Nutrition and Child Health, Ministry of Public Health, Conakry, Guinea
Diallo Ibrahima Sory, Institute of Nutrition and Child Health, Ministry of Public Health, Conakry, Guinea
Traoré Falaye, National Institute of Public Health, Ministry of Public Health, Conakry, Guinea; Departement of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Magassouba Fodé Bangaly, Departement of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Khanafer Nagham, Departement of Epidemiology and Infection Control, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France
Cissé Diao, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Abro Awo Laurent, Departement of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
Chambrier Cécile, Intensive Clinical Nutrition Service, Hospices Civils of Lyon, Lyon, France
Etard Jean Francois, Unit Recherche IRD UMI 233-INSERMU1175, Montpellier University, Montpellier, France
Diallo Mamadou Pathé, Departement of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy-Odonto-Stomatology, Gamal Abdel Nasser University of Conakry, Conakry, Guinea
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Abstract
Malnutrition leads to disruption of cognitive development and poor academic performance among children. However, few studies have been conducted in primary school to measure its burden and risk factors in Guinea. The objective of this study was to measure the prevalence of malnutrition and determine its associated factors among primary school children in Conakry, Guinea. A cross-sectional study was conducted from December 1st, 2015 to March 31st, 2016 among fifth grade primary school children in three communes of Conakry, Guinea. Children aged between 8 to 19 years were randomly selected using a two-stage sampling technic. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, of both children and their parents, and food habits were collected. The Z-scores of height-for-age and body mass index (BMI) were generated using SPSS macro 2007 developed by WHO for the analysis of anthropometric data for children aged between 5-19 years. Acute malnutrition was defined as a weight-for-height z-score ≤-2.0 standard deviation (SD) and a chronic malnutrition was considered as a height-for-age z-score ≤-2.0 standard deviation (SD). A multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess factors associated with acute or chronic malnutrition among children. A total of 2,408 children were included in the analysis. The mean age was 12.5±1.8 years, and 53.4% were female. The prevalence of acute malnutrition was 11.8% (95% CI: 10.6-13.2) and that of chronic malnutrition was 13.7% (95% CI: 12.1-14.9). Being a male (AOR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.45-2.45, p <.001), living in the communes of Dixinn (AOR = 3.78, 95% CI: 2.53-5.65, p <.001) and Matoto (AOR = 3.45, 95% CI: 2.29-5.20, p <.001), as well as having a father who was a trader (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.15-2.41, p =.007) were statistically significantly associated with acute malnutrition. Children attending Matoto schools (AOR = 3.72, 95% CI: 2.68-5.16, p<.001) were independently associated with chronic malnutrition. Acute and chronic malnutrition were common in primary school children in Conakry. Targeted awareness raising actions must be undertaken with the parents of those who have an important risk.
Keywords
Prevalence, Determinants, Malnutrition, Primary School, Guinea
To cite this article
Touré Abdoulaye, Kadio Kadio Jean-Jacques Olivier, Camara Alioune, Sidibé Sidikiba, Delamou Alexandre, Kotchi Yao Emmanuel, Barry Ibrahima Koolo, Diallo Ibrahima Sory, Traoré Falaye, Magassouba Fodé Bangaly, Khanafer Nagham, Cissé Diao, Abro Awo Laurent, Chambrier Cécile, Etard Jean Francois, Diallo Mamadou Pathé, Prevalence and Determinants of Malnutrition Among Schoolchildren in Primary Schools in the Communes of Dixinn, Matam and Matoto, Conakry, Guinea, 2016, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2018, pp. 38-47. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20180402.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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