A Short Overview of China’s Higher Education, and Students Global Mobility
Higher Education Research
Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2019, Pages: 57-60
Received: Jul. 31, 2019; Accepted: Aug. 29, 2019; Published: Sep. 16, 2019
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Author
Jean Philippe Berlie, Liberal Arts, Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
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Abstract
Background: China launched in 2013 a global project called the One Belt One Road (OBOR), renamed later the Belt and Road Inititive. This idea of modernization also exists for the higher education. Objective: This is an overview of China's higher education and prospects of development. Method: Reading and enquiry shows that China's higher education is global and has ambitious programs on higher education. Result: Between 1990 and 2010, in just twenty years, China made unbelievable progresses in higher education and stands probably unique in the world history for its progresses. The number of universities in China was 1908 in 2007, 2491 in 2013 and 2631 in 2017 (Statista 2019). This number has increased constantly over the past decade. In 2012, 400,000 of mainland China students left and studied abroad, in 2013 this number increased to 420,000 and became 550,000 in 2016 (China’s Minister of Education). The number of foreign students who came to study in China was 320,000, 380,000 and 440,000 in 2012, 2013 and 2016 respectively. In 2019, the first university of China was Tsinghua University in Beijing, followed by Beijing University, Zhejiang University and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. In the world university ranking table, Tsinghua was respectively ranked the 71st in 2012, 52nd in 2013, 30th in 2018 and 22nd in 2019. There are huge changes in higher education in China, and student mobility in higher education is high. Conclusion: This paper compares globalization, and study in particular glocalization. China certainly accepts the fact that it is more convenient to retain some Chinese local tradition, and keeps the best norms of the international higher education adapted to the Chinese cultural concepts. This is probably why China’s higher education has reached its present high level.
Keywords
China (The People’s Republic of China), Globalization, Glocalization, Higher Education, Sinicization, Student Mobility
To cite this article
Jean Philippe Berlie, A Short Overview of China’s Higher Education, and Students Global Mobility, Higher Education Research. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2019, pp. 57-60. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20190404.11
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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