Prevalence of Acridine Immunization to Subsaharians Africans Blood Donors
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 7, Issue 6, November 2019, Pages: 126-129
Received: Oct. 16, 2019; Accepted: Nov. 6, 2019; Published: Nov. 27, 2019
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Authors
Sekongo Yassongui Mamadou, Department of Training and Research, National Blood Transfusion Center, Abidjan; Côte D’Ivoire
Dasse Sery Romuald, Hospitality and University Center of Cocody, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire
Altemeyer Anaïs, Transfusion Swiss Red Cross, Bernn, Switzerland
Soraya Amar, Transfusion Swiss Red Cross, Bernn, Switzerland
Tayou Claude, Haematology and Blood Transfusion Service of University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon
Anani Ludovic, Blood Transfusion Agency, Cotonou, Benin
Kassogue Kadidia, Department of Training and Research, National Blood Transfusion Center, Abidjan; Côte D’Ivoire
Geisen Cristof, Laboratory, Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Frankfurt, German
Herbrich Anne, Laboratory, Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Frankfurt, German
Kouamenan Sidonie, Department of Training and Research, National Blood Transfusion Center, Abidjan; Côte D’Ivoire
Konate Seidou, The National Blood Transfusion Center, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
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Abstract
To conduct a study project on the inactivation of pathogens in whole blood using acridine derivatives in Africa, in order to prevent the transmission of pathogens, it is important to look for possible immunization to acridine in the blood donor population. It is therefore important to undertake an estimate of the prevalence in the sub-Saharan population in order to guide the design of the clinical study that will use the INTERCEPT Red Blood System procedure on whole blood for transfusion. to define the starting point in the evaluation of the immunological safety and transfusion safety of the product treated by this process. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of AAA among blood donors in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a multicenter prospective descriptive study of 902 blood donors collected in Côte d'Ivoire, Benin and Cameroon over the period from June 2015 to January 2017. Blood samples were collected from voluntary blood donors, of any sex, aged between 18 and 65, having given their consent for the study and having participated in the medical consultation for the donation of blood. The samples were analyzed according to the technique of the RAI gel card of the company BIORAD after centrifugation and incubation using test red cells treated with S-303 and glutathione. In the case of positive RAI results, to confirm the presence of anti-acridine, the donor plasma should be incubated with S-300. S-300 is a degradation product of S-303. The donor serum and S-300 are then incubated with the same red test cells. S-300 binds to the antibody and produces a negative result in the gel map in the presence of anti-acridin antibodies. Of the 903 samples tested both at the Abidjan laboratory in Côte D'Ivoire and at the Frankfurt laboratory, we found 1 positive sample and 8 reactive samples (positive for anti-erythrocyte antibodies). Positive donor plasma was incubated with S-300 which is the degradation product of S-303. The result is always positive, whereas according to the instructions of the reference laboratory of Frankfurt, it should be negative in case of presence of Locustacan. The results on AAA testing among 903 donors in three sub-Saharan countries show the absence of AAA in the sample of subjects included in the study according to the hypothesis emitted from this study. This opens the door to the prospect of conducting a clinical study on the inactivation of pathogens by acridine derivatives.
Keywords
Acridine, Immunization, Subsaharian, Blood Donors
To cite this article
Sekongo Yassongui Mamadou, Dasse Sery Romuald, Altemeyer Anaïs, Soraya Amar, Tayou Claude, Anani Ludovic, Kassogue Kadidia, Geisen Cristof, Herbrich Anne, Kouamenan Sidonie, Konate Seidou, Prevalence of Acridine Immunization to Subsaharians Africans Blood Donors, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2019, pp. 126-129. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20190706.11
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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