The Association Between Interleukin-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphism and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 4, Issue 3, May 2016, Pages: 81-87
Received: Apr. 27, 2016; Accepted: May 16, 2016; Published: May 28, 2016
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Authors
Sally Said Donia, Medical Phsiyology Department, Faculty of Medicine - Menoufia University, Sheben AL-Kom, Egypt
Eman Masoud Abd El Gayed, Medical Biochemistry Department, Faculty of medicine - Menoufia University, Sheben AL-Kom, Egypt
Sally Mohamed El-Hefnawy, Medical Biochemistry Department, Faculty of medicine - Menoufia University, Sheben AL-Kom, Egypt
Ahmed Ragheb, Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine-Menoufia University, Sheben AL-Kom, Egypt
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Abstract
Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Inflammation plays an important role in increased insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with lower circulating levels in T2DM. We aimed to examine the association between IL-10 and insulin resistance, and to evaluate IL-10 gene promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position -592 C/A and serum IL-10 level as risk factors for insulin resistance and T2DM. This study was carried out on 200 subjects divided into 2 groups: 110 patients with T2DM (group I), and 90 healthy subjects served as controls (group II). All participants were investigated for; fasting and 2 hour post prandial blood glucose, serum lipids, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum IL-10 and fasting serum insulin. HOMA-IR was used for assessment of insulin resistance and β cell activity. Genotyping of -592 C/A (rs1800872) SNP of IL-10 gene promoter and genotype frequencies were analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR-RFLP). The results of the present study showed significant statistical decrease in serum IL-10 levels in group I compared to group II. A significant negative correlation was found between serum IL-10 and HOMA-IR. Significant differences were observed for -592 C/A genotype distributions between both groups with increased frequency of the AA genotype in diabetic patients and increased frequency of CC genotype in controls. AA genotypes of -592 C/A was found to be a genetic risk factor for T2DM. Our results show that IL-10 has a positive association with insulin sensitivity, and SNP-592 C/A of IL-10 gene promoter and its serum level can contribute to susceptibility to insulin resistance and T2DM.
Keywords
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, IL-10, Gene Polymorphism
To cite this article
Sally Said Donia, Eman Masoud Abd El Gayed, Sally Mohamed El-Hefnawy, Ahmed Ragheb, The Association Between Interleukin-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphism and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2016, pp. 81-87. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20160403.18
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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