Comparative Levels of Immunoglobulin A Urethral Mucosa in Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis Infections in the Prison
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 30-33
Received: Feb. 8, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 29, 2016; Published: Mar. 28, 2016
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Authors
Ade Indrayani, Dermatovenereology Department, Medical Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Andi Muhammad Adam, Dermatovenereology Department, Medical Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Faridha Ilyas, Dermatovenereology Department, Medical Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Safruddin Amin, Dermatovenereology Department, Medical Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Burhanuddin Bahar, Public Health Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Rizalinda Sjahrir, Microbiology Department, Medical Faculty Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
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Abstract
Investigation of mucosa immunoglobulin A (IgA) can be used to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection, in addition to examination of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) particularly in asymptomatic cases. This research is aimed to compare the levels of IgA mucosal urethral in asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infection and non-infection in male prisoners based on PCR examination in the prison. The methods used was urethral swab specimens collected from 43 asymptomatic male prisoners at the Sidrap Prison in December 2015 and then were examined using PCR method, followed by examination of mucosal IgA levels. The results indicate prevalence of CT based on PCR examination is 2.3%. Based on the examination of PCR, mucosal IgA levels in infected by CT six-fold higher than non-infectious with a mean ± SB (4.45) vs (0.77 ± 0.52) with p = 0.09. Based on the examination of mucosal IgA, the level of infected IgA is four-fold higher than non-infectious with a mean ± SB (2.48 ± 1.41) vs (0.64 ± 0.21), with p < 0.001. The combination of a positive PCR results and/or IgA positive with urethral specimen indicate infection of CT, but PCR and IgA in CT infections are not interchangeable but both constitute complementary examination.
Keywords
Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection, IgA Mucosal, PCR
To cite this article
Ade Indrayani, Andi Muhammad Adam, Faridha Ilyas, Safruddin Amin, Burhanuddin Bahar, Rizalinda Sjahrir, Comparative Levels of Immunoglobulin A Urethral Mucosa in Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis Infections in the Prison, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 30-33. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20160402.14
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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