Benefits of Early Intervention in the Prevention of Substance Abuse: The Case Study of In–School Awareness Programmes in Enugu State
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 4, Issue 5-1, October 2016, Pages: 1-6
Received: Mar. 2, 2016; Accepted: Mar. 7, 2016; Published: Aug. 2, 2016
Views 3759      Downloads 83
Author
Nonso Maduka, Prisoners Rehabilitation and Welfare Action (PRAWA), Enugu, Nigeria
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The problem of substance abuse is one which is on the rise and a problem which governments and their agencies in very nation are seriously battling with. Most worrisome is the high involvement of the youths (adolescences and young adults) ages 11-20 years in this issue. This paper will examine the impact of the media/entertainment industry in promoting substance abuse among teens and young adults, the influence of parents, teachers, in promoting or reducing early drug use and highlight the importance of building the capacity of schools guardian and counselors, and teachers on drug abuse and counseling. It will also highlight drug type prevalence among secondary school students in Enugu using statistics obtained by questionnaires administered to students of some secondary schools in Enugu. The paper concludes that engaging parents, guardians and teachers effectively will markly reduce early exposure to substance abuse.
Keywords
Substance Abuse, Schools, Early Intervention, Media, Entertainment, Parents, Teachers, Guidance and Counselor, Enugu
To cite this article
Nonso Maduka, Benefits of Early Intervention in the Prevention of Substance Abuse: The Case Study of In–School Awareness Programmes in Enugu State, Science Journal of Public Health. Special Issue: Addiction and Substance Abuse. Vol. 4, No. 5-1, 2016, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.s.2016040501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Abasiubong, F., Idung, A. U., Udoh, S. B., & Ekanem. (2012). Parental Influence on Substance use among Young People in the Niger Delta Region, Nigeria. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies. 11(1).
[2]
Abayomi, O. Ojo, T. M, Ibrahim, N., Adelufosi A O and Obasan A., (2012). Prevalence and Correlates of Substance Use among Persons with Mental Disorders in a Nigerian Psychiatric Hospital. (2012) African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies. 11(1).
[3]
Afolabi, M. O, Abisola E. Ayilara A E., Akinyemi O A., and Ola-Olorun O J. (2012) Survey of Drug Use among Young People in Ife, Nigeria. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies, 11(2).
[4]
American Academy of Pediatrics. (2010). Children, Adolescents, Substance Abuse and the Media. Pediatrics.
[5]
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. (2014). Report: Child, Adolescent, Substance use Disorders. Ottawa ON. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse.
[6]
Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Youth Risky Behaviour Survey: Drug Trends. Atlanta. CDC.
[7]
Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Youth Risky Behaviour Survey.: Alcohol Trends. Atlanta. CDC.
[8]
Ediomo-Ubong E. Nelson (2012). Sex Work, Drug Use and Sexual Health Risk: Occupation Norms among Brothel-based Sex Workers in a Nigerian City. African Journal of Drug &Alcohol Studies, 11(2).
[9]
Eneh, A. U. and Stanley, P. C. (2004). Pattern of Substance Use among Secondary School Students in River State, Nigeria. Journal of Medicine, 13(1): 21-32.
[10]
European Monitoring Centre for Drug and Drug Addiction (2014). European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs: 2014 ESPAD REPORT. Lisbon. EMCDDA.
[11]
National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014). Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to know. Maryland. NIDA.
[12]
National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2013). Marijuana: Facts forTeens. Maryland. NIDA.
[13]
Obot, I. S. (2005). Substance use among students and out of school youth in an urban area of Nigeria. In I. S. Obot & S. Saxena (Eds), Substance use among young people in urban environments (pp. 133-146). Geneva: WHO.
[14]
Omigbodun, O. O, & Babalola, O. (2004). Psychosocial dynamics of psychoactive substance misuse among Nigerian adolescent. Annals of African Medicine, 3(3): 111-115.
[15]
Oshodi, O. J., Ikeji O. C., Olotu, S. O., Ihenyen, O. F, Obianwu, H. O.(2009). A retrospective study of Cannabis use-associated Psychopathology in a southern Nigeria treatment facility. African Journal of Drugs & Alcohol Studies. 8 (1).
[16]
Parry, C. D. H. (2005). South Africa: Alcohol today. Addicition, 100, 426-429.
[17]
The National Centre on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. (2011). Adolescent Substance use: America’s #1 Public Health Problem. New York. CASA.
[18]
The National Centre on on the Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. (2006). “You ‘ve Got Drugs”: Prescription Drug Pushers on the Internet. New York. CASA.
[19]
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. International Standards on Drug use Prevention. Vienna, UNODCP.
[20]
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (2012): 2012 World Drug Report. Vienna; UNODCP.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186