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Geo-helminthes Associated with Geophagic Pupils in Selected Primary Schools in Oyi, Anambra State
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 5-1, September 2015, Pages: 45-50
Received: Jul. 7, 2015; Accepted: Sep. 2, 2015; Published: Nov. 10, 2015
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Authors
Okereke J. N., epartment of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Obasi K. O., Department of Biological Science, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Nwadike P. O., KNCV Nigeria / Challenge TB Project, Abuja, Nigeria
Ezeji E. U., epartment of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Udebuani A. C., epartment of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
Identification of geo-helminthes associated with geophagy as well as risk factors predisposing to such infestations among primary school pupils were carried out. Ethical permissions were obtained from headteachers of schools and pupils to collect stool samples of 200 volunteer pupils, aged 5-13years (106 males and 94 females) from rural and urban primary schools in Oyi Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria. Stool samples were examined microscopically using wet mount (normal saline and iodine) technique. Data collected via questionnaires were analyzed to assess the relationship between geophagia, regular ingestion of soil and soil-transmitted parasites. Three intestinal parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides (A.lumbricoides), Ancylostoma duodenale (A. Duodenale) and Trichuris trichiura (T. Trichiura) were commonly observed. A total of 178 pupils (89%) found to be infected with one or more of these worms. A.lumbricoides had the highest prevalence of 52.8%, while A.duodenale and T.trichiura had 32.58% and14.61% respectively in all five villages in the Local Government Area. Infection rates and geophagic habits were established to be highest in children between the ages of 5 and 7years (p>0.05). Location and sex were observed to be insignificant factors in the distribution of these parasites (p>0.05). Geophagy and any other form of contact with the topsoil and children orally should therefore be noted as an important risk factor for orally acquired parasitic infections among children. Education on geophagy prevention should be an integral component of all soil-transmitted parasite control programs.
Keywords
Geophagy, Intestinal Helminthes, Pupils, Anambra State
To cite this article
Okereke J. N., Obasi K. O., Nwadike P. O., Ezeji E. U., Udebuani A. C., Geo-helminthes Associated with Geophagic Pupils in Selected Primary Schools in Oyi, Anambra State, Science Journal of Public Health. Special Issue: Who Is Afraid of the Microbes. Vol. 3, No. 5-1, 2015, pp. 45-50. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.s.2015030501.19
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