Please enter verification code
Confirm
The Influence of Physical Activity on Quality of Life in Morbidly Obese Patients with Urinary Dysfunction
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 8, Issue 3, May 2020, Pages: 72-76
Received: Apr. 27, 2020; Accepted: May 27, 2020; Published: Jun. 3, 2020
Views 322      Downloads 86
Authors
Jessica Eloa Poletto, Medical Sciences College, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Daniela Tezoto Rizzo, Medical Sciences College, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Elaine Cristina Cândido, Medical Sciences College, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Ana Maria Neder, Hospital of Clinics, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Felipe David Mendonça Chaim, Hospital of Clinics, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Elinton Adami Chaim, Hospital of Clinics, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Obesity is a disease characterized by excess fat in the body that results in damage to health. Several cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and some neoplasms are considered to be comorbidities related to obesity, as well as urinary dysfunction and, as a result, a deficit in quality of life. Adherence to physical activity can be part of the adoption of healthier lifestyles and assist in the treatment of obesity and comorbidities related to it, as well as urinary dysfunction and quality of life. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of physical activity on the quality of life of morbidly obese individuals who have urinary dysfunction. This is a cross-sectional observational pilot study. The anthropometric variables collected were weight; height; Body Mass Index (BMI); and average waist circumference. The level of physical activity of the patients was assessed using IPAQ SF –International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form. To characterize the patients in relation to the percentage of fat, the Prediction Equation for Obese Individuals – Women was used. Urinary incontinence was assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form (ICIQ-SF). Quality of life was assessed using the questionnaire WHOQOL BREF –World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Bref. A total of 47 individuals were approached and evaluated, being 31 active and 16 sedentary. There was no significant correlation between the variables analyzed in the group of active individuals. However, in the group of sedentary individuals, significant negative correlations were found between BMI and quality of life general (R=-0.610; p=0.011), physical domain (R=-0.642; p=0.007) and psychological domain (R=-0.625; p=0.009); and between percentage of fat and quality of life general (R=-0.609; p=0.012), physical domain (R=-0.637; p=0.007) and psychological domain (R=-0.590; p=0.015). Among sedentary obese people with urinary dysfunction, a significant impairment of quality of life was registered, especially in the general scope and in the physical and psychological domains. In the group of active obese patients with urinary dysfunction, there was no significant correlation between the variables analyzed.
Keywords
Physical Activity, Quality of Life, Morbidly Obese, Urinary Dysfunction
To cite this article
Jessica Eloa Poletto, Daniela Tezoto Rizzo, Elaine Cristina Cândido, Ana Maria Neder, Felipe David Mendonça Chaim, Elinton Adami Chaim, The Influence of Physical Activity on Quality of Life in Morbidly Obese Patients with Urinary Dysfunction, Science Journal of Public Health. Special Issue: Obesity and Physical Activity: Myths, Indications and Facts. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2020, pp. 72-76. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20200803.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Guyton AC, Hall JE. Tratado de Fisiologia Médica. 9ed. Rio de Janeiro: Guanabara; 1997.
[2]
McArdle DW, Katch FI, Katch VL. Fisiologia do Exercício: Energia, Nutrição e Desempenho Humano. 5ed. Rio de Janeiro: Guanabara Koogan S. A.; 2003.
[3]
Chmel R, Novackova M, Vlk R, Horcicka L. Epidemiological aspects of the femele urinary incontinence. Journal of Czech Physicians. 2005; 144: 95-7.
[4]
Baltieri L, Martins LC, Cazzo E, Modena DAO, Gobato RC, Candido EC, Chaim EA. Analysis of quality of life among asthmatic individuals with obesity and its relationship with pulmonary function: cross-sectional study. São Paulo Medical Journal. 2017; 135 (4): 332-8.
[5]
World Health Organization. Fact Sheet Obesity and Overweight. 2016. Disponível em .
[6]
Abrams, P. The standardization of terminology of lower urinary tract function report from the Standardisation Sub-Comitee of the International Continence Society. Neurourology and Urodynamics. 2002; 21 (2): 167-78.
[7]
Melville JL, Katon W, Delaney K, Newton K. Urinary incontinence in US women: a population-based study. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2005; 165 (5): 537-42.
[8]
Brown JS, Seeley DG, Fong J, Black DM, Ensrud KE, Grady D. Urinary incontinence in older women: who is at risk? Obstetrics & Gynecology. 1996; 87 (5Pt1): 715-21.
[9]
Gerten KA, Ritcher HE, Burgio KL, Redden DT. Impact of urinary incontinence in morbidly obese women versus women seeking urogynecologic care. Urology. 2007; 70 (6): 1082-5.
[10]
WHOQOL-Group. The World Health Organization quality of life assessment (WHOQOL): Position paper from the World Health Organization. Social Science and Medicine. 1995; 10: 1403-9.
[11]
Ternent L, Vale L, Buckley B, Glazener C. Measuring outcomes of importance to women with stress urinary incontinence. BJOG. 2009; 116 (5): 719-25.
[12]
Dedicação AC, Haddad M, Saldanha MES, Driusso P. Comparação da qualidade de vida nos diferentes tipos de incontinência urinária feminina. Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia. 2009; 13 (9): 5-10.
[13]
Matsudo VKR. Vida ativa para o novo milênio. Revista Oxidologia. 1999; 18-24.
[14]
Lazzoli JK, Nóbrega ACL, Carvalho T et al. Atividade física e saúde na infância e adolescência. Rev Bras Med Esporte. 1998; 4 (4): 107-9.
[15]
Pardini R, Matsudo S, Araújo T, et al. Validação do questionário internacional de nível de atividade física (IPAQ - versão 6): estudo piloto em adultos jovens brasileiros [Validation of the International Physical Activity Questionaire (IPAQ version 6): pilot study in Brazilian young adults]. Rev Bras Ciên Mov. 2001; 9 (3): 45-51.
[16]
Heyward VH, Stolarczyk LM. Avaliação da composição corporal aplicada. São Paulo. Manole: 2000.
[17]
Tamanini JTN, Dambros M, D’Ancona CAL, Palma PCR, Netto Junior NR. Validação para o português do “International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form (ICIQ-SF)”. Revista de Saúde Pública. 2004; 38 (3): 438-44.
[18]
WHOQOL-Group. The World Health Organization quality of life assessment (WHOQOL): Development and general psychometric properties. Social Science and Medicine. 1998b; 46: 1569-85.
[19]
Mourão FAG, Lopes LN, Vasconcellos NPC, Almeida MBA. Prevalência de queixas urinárias e o impacto destas na qualidade de vida de mulheres integrantes de grupos de atividade física. ACTA FISIATR. 2008; 15 (3): 170-5.
[20]
Poletto JE, Rizzo DT, Baltieri L, Cazzo E, Chaim EA. Influência da obesidade e das medidas antropométricas sobre a incontinência urinária e a qualidade de vida: um estudo piloto. RBONE. 2018; 12 (75): 901-7.
[21]
Brigatto P, Sgariboldi D, Forti EP. Qualidade de vida em mulheres obesas mórbidas com incontinência urinária. Anais 10ª. Mostra Acadêmica UNIMEP. 2012.
[22]
Guedes PF, Felipetto N, Frigo LF, Moraes CB, Colpo E. Sobrepeso e obesidade em mulheres com incontinência urinária e a repercussão na qualidade de vida. Disciplinarum Scientia. 2017; 18 (3): 539-50.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186