Infection Prevention and Control Practices in Public Health Facilities Compared to the Confessional and Private Ones
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 865-872
Received: Aug. 17, 2015; Accepted: Nov. 22, 2015; Published: Dec. 10, 2015
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Authors
Ndipowa James Attangeur Chimfutumba, Department of Nursing, Institute of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Cameroon Christian University, Bali, Cameroon
Yongabi Kenneth Anchang, Phytobiotechnology Research Foundation Institute, Catholic University of Cameroon, Bamenda, Cameroon
Dismas Ongore, School of Public Health, Department of Community Health, University of Nairobi, Kenya
Nyabola Lambert, School of Public Health, Department of Community Health, University of Nairobi, Kenya
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Abstract
Infection prevention, control and health promotion have been a serious challenge to the public health sector in Cameroon in general and in the Bamenda health district in particular. This has led to an upsurge of many infectious diseases and epidemics in recent times. It has been aggravated by the advent of the Ebola hemorrhagic disease in neighboring countries and other existing epidemics such as Poliomyelitis, Cholera, Tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and Measles. This survey compares the infection prevention, control and health promotion practices in public health facilities with those in the confessional and private health facilities. From the analyses, the number of males with sound practices doubled that of females, thus proving to be of statistical significance. Denominational or confessional health facilities equally recorded a high percentage of sound practice followed by private health facilities and then government-owned health facilities. There is also a significant relationship between “level of knowledge’’ and “infection prevention, control and health promotion practice’’ from this study.
Keywords
Infection, Prevention, Practices, Control, Health, Facilities
To cite this article
Ndipowa James Attangeur Chimfutumba, Yongabi Kenneth Anchang, Dismas Ongore, Nyabola Lambert, Infection Prevention and Control Practices in Public Health Facilities Compared to the Confessional and Private Ones, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 865-872. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150306.21
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