Rules Regulating the Change in Physiological Parameters of Rats Under Simulated Microgravity and Different Ambient Temperatures
American Journal of Civil Engineering
Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages: 27-34
Received: Jan. 18, 2019; Published: Apr. 28, 2019
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Authors
Jie Qian, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Center of Space Exploration, Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China
Gengxin Xie, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Center of Space Exploration, Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China
Jie Zheng, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China
Bo Duan, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China
Yajun Cao, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China
Xi Wang, School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Center of Space Exploration, Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China
Fengjie Li, Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Changpeng Hu, Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
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Abstract
To investigate the rules regulating changes in mean chest temperature (MCT), mean rectal temperature (MRT) and mean body weight (MW)in rats at simulated microgravity and different ambient temperatures (ATs). The −30º rat tail suspension (TS) method was used to simulate microgravity over a 7 day period at 18°C, 20°C, 23°C and 26°C AT through comparison between the TS group and control group. Each group contained six male SD rats (including one verification rat). MCT and MRT of TS group rats increased at all four levels of AT. MCT and MRT reached maximum growth rates of 0.315 and 0.118 at ATs of 20°C and 23°C, respectively. MW was reduced at ATs of 20°C and 23°C, whereas it increased at 18°C and 26°C AT in the TS group. The rates of changes of MCT, MRT and MW at different ATs were analyzed using linear regression analysis for both the control (Equation 1) and TS (Equation 2) groups. Using A new equation (Equation 3) without the influence of other factors was derived after Equation 1 minus Equation 2 to derive. The result shows that the coefficients of Equation 3 are different under the four ATs. TS and AT have coupling effects on the MCT, MRT and MW of rats.
Keywords
Tail Suspended Rats, Mean Chest Temperature, Mean Rectal Temperature, Mean Body Weight, Ambient Temperature
To cite this article
Jie Qian, Gengxin Xie, Jie Zheng, Bo Duan, Yajun Cao, Xi Wang, Fengjie Li, Changpeng Hu, Rules Regulating the Change in Physiological Parameters of Rats Under Simulated Microgravity and Different Ambient Temperatures, American Journal of Civil Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 27-34. doi: 10.11648/j.ajce.20190701.15
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