Estimation of the Calorific Value and Electrical Energy Potential of Waste Generated Biomass Within Abakaliki Meteropolis Ebonyi State, Nigeria
American Journal of Nano Research and Applications
Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2020, Pages: 42-49
Received: Aug. 20, 2020; Accepted: Aug. 31, 2020; Published: Sep. 14, 2020
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Authors
Igbo Micheal Elem, Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
Chikeleze Praise Chukwuemeka, Department of Industrial Physics, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria
Augustine Ike Onyia, Department of Industrial Physics, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria
Igbo Nkechinyere Elem, Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
Eze Calister Ngozi, Department of Physics, Federal University of Technology Minna, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria
Chima Abraham Iheanyichukwu, Department of Industrial Physics, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study was conducted to determine the electrical energy potential of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated biomass within Abakaliki metropolis, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. The MSW samples were collected at two different points from each of the waste management zones, with each zone covering at least twelve (12) streets. It was then sorted into three major categories according to their constituents viz; metals, plastics and biomass. In this study, the biomass component of the MSW sample was is our focus. Thus, the biomass sample was sun dried and then ground into powdered form. It was thoroughly mixed, shredded, sieved and subsequently analysed at the Lorcin Technologies Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Currently, an average of 360 tons of MSW is generated within Abakaliki metropolis on daily bases. This translates to an electrical energy potential of approximately 320MW. The MSW-generated biomass analysis estimates the Gross Calorific Value (GCV) or Higher Heating Values (HHV) to be 11.644MJ/kg. This value which practically determines the electrical energy of the waste sample is highly suitable for many thermal conversion processe. This translate to the fact 0.925kg of biomass will generate electrical power of 1KWh. Hence, one unit of electricity=10765KJ/Kg/GVC (KJ/Kg).
Keywords
Municipal Solid Waste, Biomass Energy, Calorific Value
To cite this article
Igbo Micheal Elem, Chikeleze Praise Chukwuemeka, Augustine Ike Onyia, Igbo Nkechinyere Elem, Eze Calister Ngozi, Chima Abraham Iheanyichukwu, Estimation of the Calorific Value and Electrical Energy Potential of Waste Generated Biomass Within Abakaliki Meteropolis Ebonyi State, Nigeria, American Journal of Nano Research and Applications. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2020, pp. 42-49. doi: 10.11648/j.nano.20200803.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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