Nanoparticles of Amorphous Cellulose and Their Properties
American Journal of Nano Research and Applications
Volume 1, Issue 1, May 2013, Pages: 41-45
Received: May 10, 2013; Published: Jun. 20, 2013
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Author
Michael Ioelovich, Dept. of Chemistry, Designer Energy Ltd, Rehovot, Israel
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Abstract
Method of preparation and some properties of amorphous cellulose nanoparticles (ANP) have been described in this paper. It was shown that ANP have spherical shape and are characterized by high degree of pantamorphia, low DP and increased content of sulfonic groups. The amorphous nanoparticles of cellulose are completely hydrolyzed by cellulolytic enzymes with forming of glucose. Concentrated paste of ANP has expressed thickening properties and therefore its additive can prevent phase separation of water dispersions of various substances. Low-acidic and soft nanoparticles can be used in cosmetic formulation for gentle skin peeling. Moreover, due to increased content of acidic functional groups, ANP can immobilize various therapeutically-active substances (TAS) containing basic functional groups. The ANP-TAS complexes can be used in remedies aimed for effective care and cure of the skin.
Keywords
Amorphous Cellulose, Nanoparticles, Isolation, Properties, Applications
To cite this article
Michael Ioelovich, Nanoparticles of Amorphous Cellulose and Their Properties, American Journal of Nano Research and Applications. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2013, pp. 41-45. doi: 10.11648/j.nano.20130101.18
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