Students' Beliefs About Mathematics Learning and Problem Solving: The Case of Grade Eleven Students in West Arsi Zone, Ethiopia
Education Journal
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2016, Pages: 62-70
Received: May 20, 2016; Accepted: May 26, 2016; Published: Jun. 30, 2016
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Authors
Mulugeta Atnafu Ayele, Department of Science & Mathematics Education, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Department of Mathematics, Medda Walabu University, Oromiya, Ethiopia
Tesfu Belachew Dadi, Department of Mathematics, Medda Walabu University, Oromiya, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Currently, there is a strong political focus in Ethiopia on science, engineering, and mathematics. This to be efficient and practical strong mathematics knowledge, which is built through effective mathematics learning and problem solving, is momentous. For this in turn students’ beliefs about mathematics learning and problem solving play an important role; since students’ beliefs are vital forces in students’ mathematics learning and problem solving. Therefore, investigating students’ beliefs about mathematics learning and problem solving is essential in educational research. To address the problem quantitative approach using survey design was employed. The data was collected from four schools in West Arsi Zone using multistage sampling. The quantitative data obtained was analyzed using mean and independent samples t-test. Consequently, this study displayed that students’ beliefs about mathematics learning, and students’ beliefs about mathematics problem solving, were neutral; and there was statistically significant difference in students’ beliefs about mathematics learning and problem solving according to stream, and parents’ residence. However, even though the mean of students’ beliefs about mathematics learning and problem solving for male students was greater than that of female students, there was no statistically significant difference between male and female students in their beliefs about mathematics learning and problem solving.
Keywords
Beliefs, Mathematics, Learning, Problem Solving
To cite this article
Mulugeta Atnafu Ayele, Tesfu Belachew Dadi, Students' Beliefs About Mathematics Learning and Problem Solving: The Case of Grade Eleven Students in West Arsi Zone, Ethiopia, Education Journal. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2016, pp. 62-70. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.20160504.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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