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Electrophoresis Study of Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) Protein Changes Under Salinity Stress
Science Research
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2016, Pages: 33-36
Received: Nov. 26, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 29, 2015; Published: Mar. 9, 2016
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Authors
Neda Sobhanian, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Hassan Pakniyat, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Mahmood Ahmadi Kordshooli, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Saeideh Dorostkar, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Massumeh Aliakbari, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Ziba Faghih Nasiri, Department of Crop Production and Plant Breeding, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
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Abstract
Salinity problem with its vast spread on the earth is one of the main factors which limits crop production. One of the methods to overcome this problem is taking advantage of the resistant genotypes. Investigation of changes resulting from the stress in an electrophoretic profile of proteins and understanding its relation with the tolerance and susceptibility of cultivars is an important criterion for identifying such cultivars. In this study, 4 wheat cultivars with different degrees of tolerance were grown in hydroponic culture under salinity treatment (0, 70, 140 and 210 mM NaCl). Leaf sampling was done on 5 leaf stage. Studying the electrophoretic pattern of the leaf soluble proteins in salinity and control treatments showed fundamental similarities among the cultivars. No polypeptide bands belonging to the specific cultivars or to one of the salinity treatments were observed. The study of protein changes by electrophoretic analysis under salinity treatment may be useful for understanding the salinity tolerance of genotypes.
Keywords
Salinity, Electrophoretic Pattern, Leaf Soluble Proteins, Salt Tolerance
To cite this article
Neda Sobhanian, Hassan Pakniyat, Mahmood Ahmadi Kordshooli, Saeideh Dorostkar, Massumeh Aliakbari, Ziba Faghih Nasiri, Electrophoresis Study of Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) Protein Changes Under Salinity Stress, Science Research. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 33-36. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20160402.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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