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Thermal Time Utilization of Plum in Semi Arid Region of Gangetic Plain
Science Research
Volume 3, Issue 1, February 2015, Pages: 19-24
Received: Jan. 15, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 6, 2015; Published: Feb. 15, 2015
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Authors
Mohan Singh, Department of Agricultural Meteorology, Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Haryana, India
Ram Niwas, Department of Agricultural Meteorology, Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Haryana, India
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Abstract
Plum prefers temperate climate thus a major crop of hills however, it has been found growing from higher hills in Srinagar to Jaipur in Rajasthan and areas around Delhi. It requires less chilling hours and can tolerate frost and high summers both, that is why it can be cultivated in both low temperatures to 0°C and up, highest up to 47°C in summers. Among the major Japanese cultivar the Kala Amritsari, Satluj Purple and Titron are planted at HAU farm in 2001 on which the present study was done during 2013-14. The overall growth was observed better in Kala Amritsari followed by Satluj purple and Titron which is a late maturing variety. The thermal time required by Kala Amritsari and Satluj Purple was at par but the Titron required more thermal indices. The heat use efficiency was observed highest for Kala Amritsari and lowest for Titron whereas the photothermal index was highest in Titron followed by Kala Amritsari and Satluj Purple. The thermal units explained the 94 per cent variation in fruit yield of Kala Amritsari, 87 per cent variation in Satluj Purple and 83 percent variation in fruit yield of Titron cultivar.
Keywords
Plum, Phenophases, GDD, HTU, PTU, HYTU, HUE
To cite this article
Mohan Singh, Ram Niwas, Thermal Time Utilization of Plum in Semi Arid Region of Gangetic Plain, Science Research. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp. 19-24. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20150301.14
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