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Susceptibility of Vegetatively Propagated Khaya anthoteca to Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi (AMF) Soil Inoculum Infection
Science Research
Volume 3, Issue 1, February 2015, Pages: 13-18
Received: Aug. 3, 2014; Accepted: Aug. 19, 2014; Published: Feb. 15, 2015
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Authors
Philip Worlanyo Dugbley, Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Dramaga Campus –Bogor 16680, Indonesia
Irdika Mansur, Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Dramaga Campus –Bogor 16680, Indonesia; SEMEO Biotrop, Jalan Raya Tajur, Bogor 16134, Indonesia
Basuki Wasis, Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Dramaga Campus –Bogor 16680, Indonesia
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Abstract
Stem tip cuttings of Khaya anthoteca seedlings were experimented for the trapping of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi (AMF). This study aimed to determine the effect of hormone and wounding treatments on the vegetative propagation of K. anthoteca seedlings and the susceptibility of these cuttings to AMF soil inoculums infection compared to some other bait species such as Sorghum bicolor and Puereria javanica. The results indicated that, K. anthoteca can successfully be propagated through stem cutting with only wounding and without hormone (auxin) applications. Analysis of variance tested at 5% significance level revealed no differences between the treatment means of hormone and wounding on the number of roots. Again, the lengths of the longest roots were not significantly different over the control treatment. In the trapping experiment, there were no significant differences in terms of root segment colonization between K. anthoteca cuttings and the other trapping species. This observation was however, frequent in the young and meristematic segments of the roots for K. anthoteca. An average root colonization of 32% was observed for K. anthoteca and the highest recorded by S. bicolor of 43%. Thus, about a third of root segments of K. anthoteca were colonized by AMF. There was also a significant positive correlation between percentage root segment colonization and the number of counted spores. The study concludes that wounding of K. anthoteca six-month old seedlings prior to vegetative propagation by cutting play vital role with respect to the rooting ability of the propagules compared to non-wounded propagules and also not significantly different from that of synthetic hormone application. Again, K. anthoteca is susceptible to AMF just like most tropical plant species in Indonesia. Finally, AMF soil inoculums can also be a good source of inoculants for establishing K. anthoteca in areas of degraded lands for revegetation purposes.
Keywords
Khaya anthoteca, Vegetative propagation, Hormone, Wounding, AMF soil inoculums
To cite this article
Philip Worlanyo Dugbley, Irdika Mansur, Basuki Wasis, Susceptibility of Vegetatively Propagated Khaya anthoteca to Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi (AMF) Soil Inoculum Infection, Science Research. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp. 13-18. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20150301.13
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