Levshenko T. Toxicologic and Hygienic Characteristics of p-373-2-20; p-5003-ac;p-294-2-35 Polyols and Prognosis of Their Potential Danger for Environment.
Science Research
Volume 1, Issue 2, April 2013, Pages: 31-34
Received: Apr. 10, 2013; Published: May 20, 2013
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Authors
Zhukov V., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Biochemistry
Telegin V., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Biochemistry
Rezunenko Y., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Biochemistry
Zaytseva O., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Medical and Biology Physics
Knigavko V., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Medical and Biology Physics
Grankina S., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Medical and Biology Physics
Levshenko T., Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine, Department of Medical and Biology Physics
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Abstract
Studied the toxic effects polyoxipropylenpolyols in acute and subacute experiments on warm-blooded animals. It is established that they are pertained to the IV hazard class; have polytropic general toxic effect; on the level of toxic doses they influence on the generative function and the genetic apparatus; inhibit and disrupt the interaction between the cellular and humoral immunity.Experiments were performed on adult Wistar white rats, white mouses, guinea pigs, hybrid mouse lines BALB / C, (SBAc57BL) F1, CBA / Lac, and rabbits of the chinchilla race [4-6]. The objects of the investigation were polyoxipropylenthriols with molecular masses 5000M (P-5003-AC), and 370M (P-373-2-20), and polyoxipropylated amine with molecular mass 290M (P-294-2-35). Polyoxipropylenpolyols P-5003-AC, P-373-2-20 and P-294-2-35 in doses of 1/10 and 1/100 DL50 have a toxic effect on the generatic function and the genetic apparatus, and in doses 1/10, 1/100 and 1/1000 DL50 inhibit and disrupt the cooperative interaction of cellular and humoral immunity. In all cases, the dose of 1/10000 DL50 was inoperative, it is equal to 3.23; 3.62 and 1.48 mg / kg of animal weight, respectively, for P-373-2-20, P-5003-AC and P-294-2- 35.
Keywords
Xenobiotics, General Toxic Effect, the Specific Types of Biological Effects
To cite this article
Zhukov V., Telegin V., Rezunenko Y., Zaytseva O., Knigavko V., Grankina S., Levshenko T., Levshenko T. Toxicologic and Hygienic Characteristics of p-373-2-20; p-5003-ac;p-294-2-35 Polyols and Prognosis of Their Potential Danger for Environment., Science Research. Vol. 1, No. 2, 2013, pp. 31-34. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20130102.14
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