Utilization of Carbon Dioxide from Coal-Firing Flue Gas for Cultivation of Spirulina platensis
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2016, Pages: 152-156
Received: Oct. 14, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 29, 2016; Published: Nov. 18, 2016
Views 3551      Downloads 108
Authors
Oanh Thi Doan, Ha Noi University of Natural Resources and Environment, Hanoi, Vietnam
Anh Kim Thi Bui, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Kien Trung Hoang, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Chuyen Hong Nguyen, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Thom Thi Dang, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Hong Diem Dang, Institute of Biotechnology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Nguyet Thi Vu, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Kim Dinh Dang, Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
CO2 emission from burning coal has been used as a carbon source for growing Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis in order to minimize the cost of biomass production, and currently to carry out CO2 bioremediation. This article presents the results of feeding S. platensis in laboratory conditions with 2 formulas including Pure CO2 and Flue gas CO2 upon using modified Zarrouk’s medium with 1.6 g / L NaHCO3 and 2g / L Na2CO3. Pure CO2 with 1.2% concentrations taken from 99% vol of industrial CO2 and CO2 gas (1.2%) received from the flue gas through the Modular system of Exhausted Gas Treatment (MEGT). Growth of the Cyanobacterium using CO2 - Flue gas is equivalent to CO2 -Pure. On this basis, S. platensis has been cultivated outdoor in an 25 m2 pond using CO2 gas (1.2%) from the tunnel brick factory emissions after suitable cleaning. The experiment in an outdoor pond system of 25 m2 indicated that the yield of biomass is of 10g/m2d with high-protein content (62.58 ± 2.34%) and fatty acids of high nutritional value (8.72 ± 0.14%), such as Omega - 6 and Omega - 3 reaching 14.74 ± 0.42% and 26.05 ± 0.64% of total fatty acid content, respectively. The quality of Spirulina cultured by CO2 gas meets the requirements for functional foods according to Vietnam national food standards. The article also presents the results of biomass productivity and chemical composition of the Cyanobacterium in different culture conditions.
Keywords
CO2, Carbon Source, Coal – Firing, Flue Gas, Cyanobacterium, Spirulina platensis
To cite this article
Oanh Thi Doan, Anh Kim Thi Bui, Kien Trung Hoang, Chuyen Hong Nguyen, Thom Thi Dang, Hong Diem Dang, Nguyet Thi Vu, Kim Dinh Dang, Utilization of Carbon Dioxide from Coal-Firing Flue Gas for Cultivation of Spirulina platensis, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2016, pp. 152-156. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20160506.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
IPCC - The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Climate Change 2007 Mitigation. (2007) Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O. R. Davidson, P. R. Bosch, R. Dave, L. A. Meyer (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 841 pp.
[2]
Juan, C. L., Guillermo, Q., Theo, S. O. S., José, M. E., Raquel, L., Raúl, M. (2013) Biotechnologies for greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, and CO2) abatement: state of the art and challenges. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 97: 2277–2303.
[3]
Maroto-Valer, M. M., Song, C., Soong, Y., (Eds). (2002) Environmental Challenges and Greenhouse Gas Control for Fossil Fuel Utilization in the 21st Century. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, 447 pp.
[4]
Song, C., Gaffney, A. M., Fujimoto, K., (Eds). (2002) CO2 Conversion and Utilization. American Chemical Society (ACS), Washington DC, ACS Symp Series Vol 809 448 pp.
[5]
Iglesias-Rodríguez, M. D., Halloran, P. R., Rickaby, R. E. M., Hall, I. R., Colmenero-Hidalgo, E., Gittins, J. R., Green, D. R. H., Tyrrell, T., Gibbs, S. J., Dassow, P. V., Rehm, E., Armbrust, E. V., Boessenkool. K. P. (2008) Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World. Science 320 (5874): 336-340.
[6]
Aiba, S., Ogawa, T. (1997) Assessment of growth yield of a blue-green alga: Spirulina platensis, in axenic and continuous culture. J of General Microbiology 102: 179-182.
[7]
Kim, D. D., T. V. Tua, N. T. Cu, D. T. Anh, D. T. Thom, H. T. Kien, L. T. T. Thuy, T. V. Nguyet, M. T. Chinh, & N. V. Vuong. (2011) Utilization of CO2 captured from the coal-fired fuel gas for growing Spirulina platensis SP4. Journal of Science and Technology 49 (4): 65 – 72 ISSN 0866 708X.
[8]
Lopes, E. J., Scoparo, C. H. G., Franco, T. T. (2008) Rates of CO2 removal by Aphanothece microscopica Nageli in tubular photobioreactors. Chemical Engineering and Processing 47: 1365–1373.
[9]
Uday, B. S., Ahluwalia, A. S. (2013) Microalgae: a promising tool for carbon sequestration. Mitig Adapt Strateg Glob Change 18: 73–95.
[10]
Kumar, K., Dasgupta, C. N., Nayak, B., Lindblad, P., Das, D. (2011) Development of suitable photobioreactor for CO2 sequestration addressing global warming using green algae and cyanobacteria. Bioresour Technol 102: 4945–4953.
[11]
Richmond, A. (2013) Handbook of microalgal culture: biotechnology and applied phycology. 3rd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd.
[12]
Seyedmahdi, H., Saeed, A., Mohamad, S. H., Fatemeh, M. (2014) Growth response of Spirulina platensis PCC9108 to elevated CO2 levels and flue gas. Biological Journal of Microorganism, 29- 36.
[13]
Song-Gun, K., Chan-Sun, P., Yong-Ha, P. (2004) Effect of CO2 Concentration on Growth and Photosynthesis of Spirulina platensis. Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis, 153: 295–298.
[14]
Nguyet M. T. T., et al,. (2013) Application studies on catalytic nano materials for removal of hazardous gases. Journal of Catalysis and adsorbent, 3: 136-142.
[15]
Aiba S., Ogawa T., 1997. Assessment of growth yield of a blue-green alga: Spirrulina platensis, in axenic and continuous culture. J. Gen. Microbiology, 10: 179-182.
[16]
Masojı´dek, J., Torzillo, G. (2014) Mass Cultivation of Freshwater Microalgae. Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, 13 pp.
[17]
Bligh, E. G., Dyer, W. J. (1959) A rapid method for total lipid extraction and purification. Can J Biochem Physiol 37: 911-917.
[18]
Official Methods of Analysis. (2000) 17th Ed., AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Gaithersburg, MD.
[19]
Horwitz, W. (2000) Official method of analysis of AOAC International. Published by AOAC International Suite 500, 481 North Frederick Avenue, Gaitherburg, Maryland 20877-2471, USA.
[20]
Negoro, M., Shioji, N., Miyamoto, K. and Miura, Y. (1991) Growth of microalgae in high CO2 gas and effects of SOx and NOx. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol., 28/29, 877-886.
[21]
Simona, A., Carlo, S., Alessandra, L., Adriana, D. B. (2013) Spirulina platensis Culture with Flue Gas Feeding as a Cyanobacteria-Based Carbon Sequestration Option. Chem Eng Technol 36 (1) 91–97.
[22]
Cheng, L., Zhang, L., Chen, H., Gao, C. (2006) Carbon dioxide removal from air by microalgae cultured in a membrane-photobioreactor. Separation and Purification Technology 50: 324–329.
[23]
Sydney, E. B., Sturm, W., Carvalho, J. C., Soccol, V. T., Larroche, C., Pandey, A., Soccol, C. R. (2010) Potential carbon dioxide fixation by industrially important microalgae. Bioresource Technology 101: 5892–5896.
[24]
Hidenori, S. (2004) Mass production of Spirulina, an edible microalga. Asian Pacific Phycology in the 21 st Century: Próspects and Challenges Developments in Hydrobiology 173 39 – 44.
[25]
Decision No. 46/2007/QD-BYT dated December 19, 2007 of the Viet Nam Ministry of Health on Promulgation regulation of maximum level of biological and chemical pollution in food.
[26]
VNNTR 8-2: 2011/BYT of the Viet Nam Ministry of Health on National technical regulation on the limits of heavy metals contamination in food.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186