Migration Due to Climate Change from the South-West Coastal Region of Bangladesh: A Case Study on Shymnagor Upazilla, Satkhira District
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2016, Pages: 145-151
Received: Sep. 25, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 8, 2016; Published: Nov. 1, 2016
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Authors
Most. Nasima Akhter, Department of Sociology, Baliadanga Khanpur College, Monirampur, Jessore, Bangladesh
Tapos Kumar Chakraborty, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Gopal Chandra Ghosh, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Prianka Ghosh, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Sayka Jahan, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Climate change has been presented as a likely trigger for migration of people, especially in Coastal areas in Bangladesh. This study investigates the climate-induced migration causes, migration pattern and destination of individual household in coastal Bangladesh. It also identifies which economic groups were migrated from this region. Data were collected through a stratified random sampling technique on 120 rural households through a defined questionnaire survey. Survey was carried out aftermath of AILA (25th May 2009), from three disasters prone unions in coastal Bangladesh. Findings showed that the main causes of migration were unemployment (65%), poverty and food insecurity (23%). The rate of temporary / seasonal migration (67%) was higher than permanent migration (20%) and most migrants choose city area (77%) as their migration place. Mainly lower economic groups (Extremely poor, poor and lower middle class) were migrated from this region for economic insufficiency. Creating job facilities and ensuring food security is the main solution for improving this problem.
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Survey, Climate Change, Migration, Coastal Bangladesh
To cite this article
Most. Nasima Akhter, Tapos Kumar Chakraborty, Gopal Chandra Ghosh, Prianka Ghosh, Sayka Jahan, Migration Due to Climate Change from the South-West Coastal Region of Bangladesh: A Case Study on Shymnagor Upazilla, Satkhira District, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2016, pp. 145-151. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20160506.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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