Assessment of the Using Patterns of Pesticides and Its Impact on Farmers Health in the Jhenidah District of Bangladesh
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 5, Issue 5, October 2016, Pages: 139-144
Received: Aug. 28, 2016; Accepted: Sep. 5, 2016; Published: Sep. 22, 2016
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Authors
Most. Nasima Akhter, Department of Sociology, Baliadanga Khanpur College, Monirampur, Jessore, Bangladesh
Tapos Kumar Chakraborty, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Prianka Ghosh, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Sayka Jahan, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Gopal Chandra Ghosh, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
Sheikh Abir Hossain, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Jessore University of Science and Technology, Jessore, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Unreasonable utilization of pesticides is progressively debilitating our biological community, well-being and environment. The main objectives of these studies were to examine the pesticide using pattern and its impact on farmer’s health. Kaligonj and Jhenaidah sadar upazila of Jhenaidah districts were selected as a study area, where agriculture is the main sources of livelihood. Data were collected from randomly selected 80 farmers through a defined questionnaire. Study finding indicates that most of the farmers used insecticide (80%) in their agricultural fields and about (75%) farmers were could not read the level of the pesticides packet/bottle as a result they applied in a high dose. About seventy-seven percentage (77%) farmers used hand derived sprayer machines for pesticide application and during that time 80% farmers were not taking any types of protective measures. Gastro- intestinal diseases (84%), eye diseases (64%), skin diseases (60%) and urine and sexual diseases (54%) were the most common diseases in the study area. Farmers who were engaged in agricultural practices during 15-19 years they were suffering most from various types of health problem. Intensive awareness training of farmers on safety measures regarding the application of pesticides and its rational use is necessary to avoid potential health hazards.
Keywords
Pesticides, Using Patterns, Health Impacts, Farmers, Bangladesh
To cite this article
Most. Nasima Akhter, Tapos Kumar Chakraborty, Prianka Ghosh, Sayka Jahan, Gopal Chandra Ghosh, Sheikh Abir Hossain, Assessment of the Using Patterns of Pesticides and Its Impact on Farmers Health in the Jhenidah District of Bangladesh, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2016, pp. 139-144. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20160505.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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