Effect of Coffee Processing Plant Effluent on the Physicochemical Properties of Receiving Water Bodies, Jimma Zone Ethiopia
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2015, Pages: 83-90
Received: Dec. 10, 2014; Accepted: Dec. 18, 2014; Published: Feb. 25, 2015
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Authors
Dejen Yemane Tekle, Mekelle University, College of Health Science, Department of Public Health, Mekelle, Ethiopia
Abebe Beyene Hailu, Jimma University, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science and Technology, Jimma, Ethiopia
Taffere Addis Wassie, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopian Institute of Water Resource, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Azeb Gebresilassie Tesema, Mekelle University, College of Health Science, Department of Public Health, Mekelle, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Although the coffee wastewater emanating from the traditional coffee processing plants in Jimma zone is a valuable resource, it is disposed off to the nearby water course without any treatment. As a result, it becomes a severe threat to the aquatic ecosystem and downstream users. To tackle this problem, understanding the nature of the coffee processing wastewater is fundamental for the design and operation of appropriate and effective treatment technologies. Thus, the main objective of this study was to assess the effect of coffee processing plant effluent on the physicochemical properties of receiving water bodies of Jimma zone Ethiopia. Based on the results of the physicochemical parameters, it was proved that the coffee effluent has a remarkable polluting potential during the wet coffee-processing season. The concentrations of the physicochemical parameters were significantly (p<0.05) increased following effluent discharge except TSS and temperature, when downstream or impacted (L) compared with upstream or non-impacted (U) sites. If business-as-usual scenario is followed, the economic gains accrued as a result of coffee export will be worthless due to the alarming water quality degradation and aquatic ecosystem disturbance. Therefore, urgent intervention in the area of coffee factory for effluent management options should be dealt with top priority to avoid further needless damage to the environment.
Keywords
Coffee Processing Plant, Coffee Wastewater, Physicochemical Properties, Water Bodies, Jimma Zone
To cite this article
Dejen Yemane Tekle, Abebe Beyene Hailu, Taffere Addis Wassie, Azeb Gebresilassie Tesema, Effect of Coffee Processing Plant Effluent on the Physicochemical Properties of Receiving Water Bodies, Jimma Zone Ethiopia, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2015, pp. 83-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20150402.12
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