Response Strategy and Scenarios for Accidents in Crude Oil and Gas Pipelines
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, November 2015, Pages: 18-25
Received: Aug. 10, 2015; Accepted: Aug. 12, 2015; Published: Oct. 16, 2015
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Author
Huseyin Murat Cekirge, Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Grove School of Engineering, the City College of the City University of New York, New York, USA
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Abstract
This paper introduces response scenarios used for spill training, planning, and real time oil spill response to be utilized for mitigation of spill accidents. A series of scenarios with the response guidelines and strategies are presented during accidents of crude oil and natural gas (NG) and natural gas liquids (NGL) pipelines.
Keywords
Accident Scenarios for Hydrocarbon Pipelines, Risk Scenarios, Strategies for Accidents of Crude Oil Pipelines, Strategies for Accidents of NG and NGL Pipelines
To cite this article
Huseyin Murat Cekirge, Response Strategy and Scenarios for Accidents in Crude Oil and Gas Pipelines, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Special Issue: Environmental Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) and Risk Assessment of Crude Oil and Gas Pipelines. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2015, pp. 18-25. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.s.2015030601.13
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