Can Capsaicin Present in Food Act as Carcinogenic, Antitumor or Both
Cancer Research Journal
Volume 2, Issue 6-1, December 2014, Pages: 34-41
Received: Nov. 28, 2014; Accepted: Dec. 1, 2014; Published: Dec. 27, 2014
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Authors
Guilherme Barroso Langoni de Freitas, Post-Degree Program in Internal Medicine and Health Sciences at UFPR, Department of Clinical Patology, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil; Department of Pharmacy, State University of Center-West, Guarapuava, Parana, Brazil
Najeh Maissar Khalil,
Iara José de Messias-Reason, Post-Degree Program in Internal Medicine and Health Sciences at UFPR, Department of Clinical Patology, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil
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Abstract
Pepper is amongst the most widely consumed spices in the world. However, what few people know, is that the pungent substance responsible for its blazing characteristic has many other biological properties, e.g. analgesic, antiinflammatory, antitumor and even carcinogenic. Several studies have discussed the antitumor and carcinogenic potential of this secondary metabolite. Nevertheless, the literature still lacks a comprehensive study relating the biological effects of capsaicin with the consumed dose, for both pharmacological and toxicological mechanisms. To solve this deficiency, the aim of this study was to discuss in details all the points mentioned above, in order to clarify the major questions about the subject.
Keywords
Capsaicin, Cancer, Antitumor, Carcinogenic, Mechanism of Action
To cite this article
Guilherme Barroso Langoni de Freitas, Najeh Maissar Khalil, Iara José de Messias-Reason, Can Capsaicin Present in Food Act as Carcinogenic, Antitumor or Both, Cancer Research Journal. Special Issue:Lifestyle and Cancer Risk. Vol. 2, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 34-41. doi: 10.11648/j.crj.s.2014020601.14
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