The Effects of High and Low-Dose Cordyceps Militaris-Containing Mushroom Blend Supplementation After Seven and Twenty-Eight Days
American Journal of Sports Science
Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages: 1-7
Received: Nov. 30, 2017; Accepted: Dec. 8, 2017; Published: Jan. 12, 2018
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Authors
Wesley David Dudgeon, Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Charleston, Charleston, United States
Dennison David Thomas, Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Charleston, Charleston, United States
William Dauch, Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Charleston, Charleston, United States
Timothy Paul Scheett, Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Charleston, Charleston, United States
Michael John Webster, School of Health Sciences, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, United States
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the aerobic performance effect of 1) low-dose mushroom blend supplementation (1.0 - 2.0 g/day) over a prolonged time period of 28 days compared to a placebo and 2) a higher dose of PeakO2 (12 g/day) for seven days compared to placebo supplementation. For Trial 1, 40 young adult (19-34 yrs) subjects met participation criteria and were randomized into one of two groups. The treatment group (T, n=23) consumed 1.0-2.0 g /day of mushroom blend (PeakO2) along with 2.0g of Gatorade powder for 28 days. The control group (C, n=17) consumed placebo (whole wheat flour) and Gatorade powder in identical fashion. At baseline each participant completed a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, which included a 5-minute economy state from minutes 3-8 along with a Wingate cycle ergometer test (peak power) at least 24 hrs later. Forty-three young adult subjects met participation criteria for Trial 2 and were randomized into one of two groups. T (n=29), consumed 12.0 g /day of mushroom blend (PeakO2) along with 12.0 g of Gatorade powder for one week. C (n=14) consumed placebo (whole wheat flour) and Gatorade powder in identical fashion There were no differences between groups in any variables at baseline. After 28 days of supplementation, T had a significant increase (< 0.05) in time to fatigue, a significant increase in VO2peak (p < 0.05) and a reduction in blood lactate (p < 0.05) during the economy phase. Analysis for trial 2 was conducted stratifying each group by VO2peak at baseline, in which the top 50% of each group was compared to the bottom 50% (Treatment top, MT, Treatment bottom, MB, Control top, CT, Control bottom, CB). The MB group experienced significant (p<0.05) increases in VO2peak. MB increased VO2max significantly (p < 0.05) while MT, CT, and CB did not change significantly. The MT group experienced a significant 3 bpm drop in economy HR from pre- to post-testing (p < 0.05). The PT demonstrated a significant 4.5% increase in peak power from pre- to post-testing (p < 0.05). No other changes were detected. These data suggest that longer duration, lower dose, supplementation of PeakO2 appears to improve endurance performance in apparently healthy young adults. Further, short duration supplementation of higher doses of PeakO2 may improve performance, but differing effects may occur based upon fitness level.
Keywords
Exercise, Cordyceps, Mushroom, Lactate, VO2
To cite this article
Wesley David Dudgeon, Dennison David Thomas, William Dauch, Timothy Paul Scheett, Michael John Webster, The Effects of High and Low-Dose Cordyceps Militaris-Containing Mushroom Blend Supplementation After Seven and Twenty-Eight Days, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20180601.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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