Study of Nuts and Dried Fruits Consumption in Adolescents in Relation to Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 1-2, February 2016, Pages: 8-13
Received: Jul. 28, 2015; Accepted: Jul. 30, 2015; Published: Jan. 13, 2016
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Authors
Parvin Mirmiran, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Shirin Ghotboddin Mohammadi, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Zahra Bahadoran, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Fereidoun Azizi, Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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Abstract
Background and aim. This study was conducted to investigate the association of consumption of nuts and dried fruits with the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components adolescents. Material and Methods. In this cross-sectional study was conducted in 785 adolescents, aged 10-19 y, participated in the fourth phase of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Demographics, anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were evaluated. MetS and its components were defined based on a modified definition of de Ferranti. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dried fruits and nuts were included dried figs, raisins, dried berries, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, pistachios, hazelnuts and seeds. To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in quartiles of dried fruits and nuts consumption, logistic regression models adjusted for confounding variables were used. Results. Mean age and body mass index of participants (47% male) was 14.8±2.9 years, and 22.1 ± 4.7 kg/m2, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was 22.2% (girls: 19.5% and boys: 25.2%). In the highest compared to lowest quartile of nuts and dried fruits, the prevalence of lipid disorders, abdominal obesity and MetS was non-significantly lower. Serum triglycerides significantly decreased across increasing consumption of nuts and dried fruits (P<0.05). After adjustment for confounding variables, the odds of MetS in the highest compared to the lowest quartile of nuts and dried fruits were 0.65 (95% CI: 0.4-1.1). Conclusion. Increased consumption of nuts and dried fruits could have favorable effect in prevention of metabolic syndrome and its components.
Keywords
Metabolic Syndrome, Dried Fruits, Nuts, Children and Adolescent
To cite this article
Parvin Mirmiran, Shirin Ghotboddin Mohammadi, Zahra Bahadoran, Fereidoun Azizi, Study of Nuts and Dried Fruits Consumption in Adolescents in Relation to Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Special Issue: Nutrition and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors. Vol. 5, No. 1-2, 2016, pp. 8-13. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2016050102.12
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