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Distribution of Bacterial Species and Evaluation of their Antimicrobial Susceptibility Support a General Approach that Urinary Tract İnfections are Considered Complicated in Men
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 21-24
Received: Jan. 22, 2014; Published: Mar. 10, 2014
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Authors
Esat Korgali, Department of Urology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
Mustafa Gökhan Gözel, Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
Emin Yener Gültekin, Department of Urology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
Mustafa Zahir Bakici, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
Semih Ayan, Department of Urology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
Gökhan Gökçe, Department of Urology, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey
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Abstract
Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in men are considered complicated, however few studies support this view. We compared the differences in the causative microorganism and their antimicrobial resistance between male and female patients presenting with an UTI. Methods: We evaluated the all microorganism isolated from the urine samples of patients which were admitted to outpatient clinics of our hospital during 2006 – 2011, which diagnosed with uncomplicated community acquired UTI. Results: Totally 8730 bacterial strains were isolated. Of these strains 5168 (59.2%) were isolated in women, whereas 3562 (40.8%) were isolated in men. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated microorganism (64.4%), followed by other enterobacteriaceae (15.1%) and enterococci (17.8%). However, the frequency of E. coli in men was significantly lower than in women, and frequency of other enterobacteriaceae and frequency of enterococci were higher than in women (49.4% versus 74.7%, 21.2% versus 10.8%, 24.7% versus 12.9%, respectively, p=0.001). The distribution of microorganism was evaluated according to age groups, similar results were observed in all age groups. In addition, E. coli, the most common strains for both sex. E. coli strains isolated in men were significantly less sensitive to ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin than in women (p<0.05). Conclusion: The distribution of bacterial species isolated from urine culture of UTI is different in men. Even though E. coli is the most common strains in men as in women. In addition E. coli strains isolated in men were more resistant to antibiotics.
Keywords
Urinary Tract Infection, E. coli, Antimicrobial Resistance, Community Acquired
To cite this article
Esat Korgali, Mustafa Gökhan Gözel, Emin Yener Gültekin, Mustafa Zahir Bakici, Semih Ayan, Gökhan Gökçe, Distribution of Bacterial Species and Evaluation of their Antimicrobial Susceptibility Support a General Approach that Urinary Tract İnfections are Considered Complicated in Men, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2014, pp. 21-24. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20140302.13
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