Novel Discovery of the Relationship of Clinical Phenotype of Coronary Heart Disease with Retinol Binding Protein 4, Lipoprotein-Related Phospholipase A2
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 131-134
Received: May 2, 2017; Accepted: May 18, 2017; Published: Jun. 29, 2017
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Authors
Liu-qiang Lv, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Huaibei People’s Hospital, Huaibei, China
Yang-zhang Tang, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Huaibei People’s Hospital, Huaibei, China
Shi-qiang Wang, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Huaibei People’s Hospital, Huaibei, China
Gui Ren, Department of Bioengineering, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Fremont, USA
Yu-Chen Lo, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA
Hiroshi Honda, Department of Bioengineering, Northwestern Polytechnic University, Fremont, USA
Edward J. Parish, Department of Chemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, USA
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Abstract
To investigate the correlation between retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (LP-PLA2), we studied the clinical phenotype of coronary heart disease (CHD) and the severity of coronary artery disease. Our studies showed that the changes of retinol binding protein 4, LP-PLA2 serum concentration has a relation with the severity of coronary artery disease progression, but no clear relationship with the degree of coronary artery lesion and count. Furthermore, LP-PLA2 concentration increases with the increase of the severity of coronary artery disease and disease occurrences.
Keywords
Retinol Binding Protein 4, Lipoprotein Associated Phospholipase A2, Coronary Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Lesion Degree
To cite this article
Liu-qiang Lv, Yang-zhang Tang, Shi-qiang Wang, Gui Ren, Yu-Chen Lo, Hiroshi Honda, Edward J. Parish, Novel Discovery of the Relationship of Clinical Phenotype of Coronary Heart Disease with Retinol Binding Protein 4, Lipoprotein-Related Phospholipase A2, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2017, pp. 131-134. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20170604.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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